(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Echo"


££$ 



is® 



Mii 



IBi 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/echo1947smit 



Foreword 



SMITH ACADEMY: 1872-1947 

Hail! Thou democratic school! 

Thou symbol, thou true home of knowledge. 
With books of glory, tantalizing glory, 

And scholarship to match thy sister college. 

Hail! Thou democratic school! 

Thy founding, perpetual study foretold. 
Through long triumphant years resound 

Praise of thee from young and old. 

Hail! Thou democratic school! 

Thy founding true democracy did uphold. 
Voices rise e'en from out the past 

Chanting the joys of life thou dost unfold. 

Hail! Thou democratic school! 

Where knowledge hath led us ever on. 
Now the future calls, but far or near, 

Faithful memories shall e'er live on. 

JANET ZUCHOWSKI '47 




MR. CLARENCE J. LARKIN 

The Smith Academy Senior Class is very happy to dedicate this 
Year Book to Mr. Clarence J. Larkin, who during the years he was 
principal of Smith Academy, won the fond admiration and respect of all 
his students. He was our principal, teacher, and guide for the first three 
years of our course, and we shall always remember him as a true friend 
and w:se counselor. To him, we wish happiness in the new work he has 
undertaken. 



"So let the way wind up the hill or down. 
O'er rough or smooth, the journey will be joy; 
Still seeking what I sought when but a boy, 
New friendships, high adventure, and a crown, 
My heart will keep the courage of the quest, 
And hope the road's last turn will be the best." 



PURPLE AND WHITE ECHO 

Issued by the Senior Class of Smith Academy 
Hatfield, Massachusetts 



Vol. VII 



June, 1947 



CONTENTS 

Foreword 1 

Dedication 2 

Faculty 4 

Year Book Staff 5 

Senior Pictures 6-10 

Class History 11 

Class Day Program 12-23 

They'll Never Forget 24 

Senior Auto 24 

Seniorscope 25 

Class Song and Poem 26 

Student Council 27 

School Paper Staff 28 

Junior Class 29 

Sophomore Class 30 

Freshman Class 31 

Boys' Basketball Team 32 

Soccer Team 33 

Girls' Basketball Team 34 

Literary 35-39 

Thespians 40-41 

Pro Merito 42 

Prize Speakers 43 

Washington Trip 44-47 

Washington Trip Snaps 48 

Informal Snaps 49 

School Autographs 50 

Autographs 51 

Appreciation 52 

Advertisements 53-64 



PURPLE AND WHITE ECHO 



The Faculty 





B' " Bl w ^ ^*»^ **'' 

^^^ ^ '^^ ^^^B V**"- 

H .B "jl ^B aw ^Hl " flfl ^K 

HI k, j ■ <*■ jp Br*'] 
B Al Bw fl Bt A Bud 

bw'^tI bbI '' $» 




i» '* - ^P | H^*% **** v i\ «BM 





Front Row: Mrs. Marjorie Day, Mrs. Margaret Pruzynski, Miss Mary Ryan. Mrs. 
Bridget O'Neill, Mrs. Florence Muller. 

Back Row: Coach John Symanczyk. Principal John Jakohek, Mr. Wallace Hibbard. 



JOHN C. JAKOBEK, A.B., M.S., Principal University of Massachusetts 

Algebra, Chemistry, Geometry, Trigonometry 

MARY E. RYAN, A.B. Smith College 

Classical English, Commercial English 3-4 

MARGARET E. PRUZYNSKI McCarthy's Business College 

Shorthand, Typing. Business Arithmetic 



FLORENCE E. MULLER, A.B. 

Latin. French, World History 



Wheaton College 



BRIDGET C. O'NEILL Bay Path Institute, Commercial College, N.Y.U 

Shorthand I, Commercial English 1-2, Business Training, Bookkeeping 



MARJORIE DAY, B.S. 



Household Arts Instructor 



University of Massachusetts 



JOHN J. SYMANCYK, B.A.. B.S. American International College, N.Y.U. 

Biology, Science, History. Problems of Democracy 



WALLACE HIBBARD 



University of Massachusetts, Vermont Academy 
Agriculture Instructor 



SMITH ACADEMY 



Year Book Staff 




Front Row: Evelyn Kacinski, Bernice Buckowski, Jennie Maiewski, Margaret Vachula, 
Joanne Howard, Bernard Sawicki, Leonard Karpinski, John Fortsch. 

Back Row: Stacia Kostek, Annette Kempisty, Lucy Szych, Stanley Kirejczyk, Dorothy 
Skarzinski, Helen Michalowski, Miss Ryan, Mrs. Pruzynski. 



Co-Editors Jennie Maiewski, Margaret Vachula, Joanne Howard 

Associate Editors Dorothy Skarzinski, Evelyn Kacinski 

Literary Editors Annette Kempisty, Bernice Buckowski 

Typists Lucy Szych, Stacia Kostek, Helen Michalowski 

Sports Editors Stanley Kirejczyk 

Business Managers Bernard Sawicki, Leonard Karpinski, Annette Kempisty 



PURPLE AND WHITE ECHO 




BEHNICE BUCKOWSKI "Benny" 

Hatfield, General: Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4. Chorus 1, 2, 3, 4. 
Prize Speaking 3. Thespians 2, 3, 4. Senior Play 4. 
Basketball 2, 3. School Paper 3, 4. Yearbook 3, 4. Secre- 
tary Student Council 4. Smith Academy Choristers 2. 
Comes from across the river . . . visits school very 
seldom . . . born to roam (Texas) . . . wants to be 
second Sherlock Holmes. 






JOHN FORTSCH "Fortschie" 

Hatfield, Classical: Glee Club 1, 2, 3. 4. Chorus 1, 2, 3, 4. 
Pro Merito 3. Yearbook 2, 3. Prize Speaking 3. Soccer 
3, 4. Baseball 3. Basketball 3. 4. Thespians 3, 4. Wash- 
ington Trip 4. Exploding experimenter . . . class genius 
. . . knows what fun is, too . . . atomic-minded. 



DANIEL FUSEK "Scotch" 

Hatfield, General: Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4. Chorus 1. 2. 3. 4. 
Prize Speaking 3. 

Supreme mechanic . . . owns motorcycle . . . quiet 
boy . . . tall . . . bound to succeed. 



JOANNE HOWARD "Jo" 

Hatfitld. Classical: Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4. Chorus 1. 2. 3. 4. 
Yearbook 3, 4. School Paper 2, 3. 4. Thespians 3, 4. 

Senior Play 3, 4. Washington Trip 4. Smith Academy 
Choristers 2. 

Air-minded . . . giggles . . . always asking questions 
. . . neat dresser . . . square dances. 



SMITH ACADEMY 



LEONARD KARPINSKI "Karpie" 

Hatfield, Commercial: Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4. Chorus 1, 2, 
3, 4. Thespians 3, 4. Senior Play 3, 4. Class Vice- 
President 1, 3. Class President 4. School Paper 4. Year- 
book 4. Washington Trip 4. 

Mr. President . . . always talking . . . class pet . . . 
blushes easily ... a six-footer . . . lanky. 



ANNETTE KEMPISTY "Andza" 

Hatfield, Classical: Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4. Chorus 1, 2, 3, 4. 
Thespians 2, 3, 4. Senior Play 2, 3, 4. Vice-President 
Thespians 3. Basketball 3, 4. School Paper 2, 3, 4. 
Yearbook 3, 4. Class Secretary 2. Prize Speaking 3. 
Washington Trip 4. 

Blondie . . . service men . . . class glamour girl . . . 
doesn't like to study . . . why school, anyway? 



STANLEY KIERJCZYK "Stan" 

Hatfield, Classical: Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4. Chorus 1, 2, 3, 4. 
Prize Speaking 3. Soccer 1, 2, 3, 4. Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4. 
School Paper 2, 3, 4. Pro Merito 3, 4. Yearbook 3, 4. 
Basketball 3, 4. Washington Trip 4. Student Council 
1, 3, 4. President Student Council 4. Class President 3. 
Glass Treasurer 2. Pro Merito Delegate 3, 4. 
Great athlete . . . has blondes on his mind . . . mathema- 
tician . . . third honor student. 



STACIA KOSTEK "Sta" 

Hatfield, Commercial: Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4. Chorus 1, 2, 
3, 4. Prize Speaking 3. Thespians 4. Senior Play 4. 
School Paper 4. Yearbook 4. Class Secretary 3, 4. Pro 
Merito 3, 4. Washington Trip 4. D.A.R. Pilgrim 4. 
Helpful . . . full of fun . . . nice to be with . . . Ray. 







PURPLE AND WHITE ECHO 





IRENE KRAULIS "Renie" 

Hatfield, Commercial: Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4. Chorus 1, 2, 

3, 4. Chorus 1, 2, 3, 4. Prize Speaking 3. Thespians 4. 

Smith Academy Choristers 2. 

Tee Hee . . . giggles . . . eats enough to feed an army 

. . . shortie . . . Brooklyn . . . she and "Helen" . . . great 

comedienne. 



JENNIE MAIEWSKI "Jennie" 

Hatfield, General: Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4. Chorus 1, 2, 3, 4. 
Pro Merito 3, 4. School Paper 3, 4. Yearbook 3, 4. Pro 
Merito Delegate 3, 4. Valedictorian. 

Reserved . . . makes great pair with "Cookie" . . . loves 
to read . . . interested in world affairs. 



HELEN MICHALOWSKI "Helcha" 

Hatfield, Commercial: Glee Club 1, 2, 3. 4. Chorus 1. 2. 
3, 4. Smith Academy Choristers 2. Thespians 4. Basket- 
ball 1, 2. Softball 1. School Paper 2, 3, 4. Yearbook 4. 
Stage Properties 1, 2. 

"Renie's" partner in hysterics . . . great fun-lover . . . 
never a dull moment when she's around . . . lover of 
gum . . . "Calvin"? ? ? 




GERTRUDE PETRIKOSKI "Gertie" 

Hatfield, Commercial: Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4. Chorus 1. 2. 
3, 4. President of "Cooking Club" 1. Washington 
Trip 4. 

Has lots to say . . . goes steady . . . South Deerfield 
. . . giggles . . . had a great time in Washington. 



SMITH ACADEMY 



BERNARD SAWICKI "Bernie" 

Hatfield, Classical: Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4. Chorus 1, 2, 3, 4. 
Thespians 2, 3, 4. Senior Play 2, 3, 4. Pro Merito 3, 4. 
Pro Merito Delegate 3, 4. Pro Merito Vice-President 4. 
School Paper 3, 4. Yearbook. Class President 1. Prize 
Speaking 3. Dramatic Club President 3, 4. Washington 
Trip 4. 

Hopkins enthusiast . . . practical joker . . . excellent 
manager . . . fun-lover at heart . . . Salutatorian. 



LUCILLE SZYCH "Lucy" 

Hatfield, Commerc'al: Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4. Chorus 1, 2, 
3, 4. Yearbook 4. Thespians 4. Senior Play 4. School 
Paper 3, 4. Basketball 4. Smith Academy Choristers 2. 
Future secretary . . . quiet girl? ? ? has sworn off 
all men?? . . .baby sitter . . . "Calvin . . . MIKE. 




MARGARET VACHULA "Peep" 

North Hatfield, Classical: Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4. Chorus 1, 
2, 3, 4. Pro Merito 3. Class Treasurer 1, 3, 4. Student 
Council 2, 3, 4. Vice-President Student Council 4. Class 
President 2. Thespians 3, 4. Senior Play 3, 4. Vice- 
President Thespians 4. Manager Girls' Basketball Team 4. 
Prize Speaking 3. Yearbook 3, 4. School Paper 1, 2, 3, 4. 
Smith Academy Choristers 3. 

Benny's pal . . . leader . . . heart in North Hadley . . . 
great dare-devil. 



ALEX WIDELO "Kabola" 

Hatfield, Commercial: Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4. Chorus 1, 2, 
3, 4. Thespians 3, 4. Senior Play 3, 4. Manager, Base- 
ball 3. Assistant Manager Basketball 3, 4. Assistant 
Manager Soccer 3. Soccer 3, 4. Prize Speaking 3. Class 
Vice-President 4. 

Loud!!! but handsome . . . likes sports . . . loves to 
tease the girls. 




10 



PURPLE AND WHITE ECHO 




JANET ZUCHOWSKI "Cookie" 

Hatfield, General: Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4. Chorus 1, 2, 3, 4. 
School Paper 1, 3, 4. Thespians 4. 

Quiet . . . minds her own business . . . nice to talk to 
. . . men don't bother her??? 



Ex-Seniors 



MARGARET WENTZEL 
WALTER KUCHYT 
VALERIA MATUSIEWICZ 
GERTRUDE ZEMBISKI 
PAULINE ZAPKA 
EDWARD SZEWCZYK 
YOLANDA CUNNINGHAM 



CARL RAFFA 
ROBERT CUTTER 
MYRON SIKORSK1 
ARTHUR PROULX 
JAMES McGRATH 
RICHARD LABBEE 
CATHERINE SMITH 



EDWARD VACHULA 



SMITH ACADEMY 



11 



Class History 



When we came to Smith Academy as 
freshmen we were scared to death because 
we thought we would get pushed around. 
But our fears proved unnecessary for upper 
classmates were most tolerant, we found 
out. We elected the following officers: Bern- 
ard Sawicki, president; Leonard Karpinski, 
vice-president; Walter Kuchyt, secretary; 
Margaret Vachula, treasurer. Mr. Bart and 
Mrs. Muller were our class advisors. We 
were honored at a freshman reception given 
by the junior class and we all had a won- 
derful time. Nothing too exciting happened 
in our freshman year. We managed to 
struggle along with our new subjects, and 
at the same time support the waste paper 
drives, buy war-saving stamps, and engage 
in other war-time activities that needed our 
support. It was in that year, too, we saw 
several British war films shown in the 
assembly and learned how civilians were 
fighting the incendiary bombs in their own 
homes. 

As sophomores, we elected the following 
officers: Margaret Vachula, president; Ed- 
ward Vachula, vice-president; Annette 
Kempisty, secretary; and Stanley Kirej- 
czyk, treasurer. Our class advisors were 
Miss Connelly and Mr. Larkin. Our first 
class activity was a Halloween party which 
was considered a success by all. This was 
also a war-year, and our activities were 
similar to those of our first year. On May 
8, during spring vacation, came V-E Day — 
the end of the war in Europe. We came 
back for the closing weeks of school 
cheered by this fact, and hopeful for an 
early V-J Day. 

When we came back to S. A. as juniors 
in September of 1945 hostilities had ceased 
— V-J Day was August 14. Thus we began 
our first school year held in a peace-time 
atmosphere. On Friday, September 13, we 
elected the following officers: president, 
Stanley Kirejczyk; vice-president, Leonard 
Karpinski; secretary, Stacia Kostek; and 
treasurer, Arthur Proulx. Our class ad- 
visors were Mrs. O'Neill and Mr. Syman- 



cyk.. Stanley Kirejczyk and Margaret 
Vachula were our representatives for the 
Student Council. For the party at which 
we initiated the freshmen, the following 
people served on the initiation committee: 
Bernice Buckowski, Leonard Karpinski, 
Annette Kempisty, Helen Michalowski, and 
John Fortsch. Margaret Vachula, Jennie 
Maiewski, Stacia Kostek, Bernard Sawicki, 
Stanley Kirejczyk, and John Fortsch be- 
came members of the Junior Pro Merito. 
In May, the annual prize speaking contest 
was held; Bernice Buckowski and John 
Fortsch received first prize, and Annette 
Kempisty and Stanley Kirejczyk received 
second. Other members who spoke were 
Irene Kraulis, Margaret Vachula, Stacia 
Kostek, Alex Widelo, Bernard Sawicki, and 
Daniel Fusek. At the close of the year, 
Annette Kempisty and Margaret Vachula 
were picked as two members of the Queen's 
Court at the Prom. 

In September of 1946 we all came back 
excited because we were seniors, and we 
would be out in June. The following people 
were elected as officers: Leonard Karpinski, 
president; Alex Widelo, vice-president; 
Stacia Kostek, secretary; and Margaret 
Vachula, treasurer. Our class adviser was 
Miss Ryan. Jennie Maiewski, Stacia Kostek, 
Bernard Sawicki, and Stanley Kirejczyk re- 
mained as Senior Pro Meritos. Stanley 
Kirejczyk was the all-around athlete from 
our class playing in three sports. Many of 
the Seniors participated in the play "Dan- 
gerous Ladies." The most exciting event of 
the year was our Washington Trip, which 
came in April. Only eight members went on 
this trip, but they reported a wonderful 
time. We sponsored a couple of Square 
Dances that proved to be quite successful. 

In May the honor students were an- 
nounced: Jennie Maiewski, valedictorian; 
Bernard Sawicki, salutatorian; and Stanley 
Kirejczyk, third honor student. This com- 
pletes our four years at S. A., so farewell, 
classmates, and best of luck to you all. 

STACIA KOSTEK 



12 i PURPLEANDWHITEECHO 



Class Night Program 

Wednesday, June 18, 1947 



THE NATIONAL ANTHEM 

ADDRESS OF WELCOME 

LEONARD KARPINSKI, Class President 

CLASS STATISTICS 

STACIA KOSTEK, HELEN MICHALOWSKI. LUCY SZYCH 

CLASS PROPHECY 

JOANNE HOWARD ANNETTE KEMPISTY 

JOHN FORTSCH DANIEL FUSEK 

SELECTION Girls' Glee Club 

"The Lass With the Delicate Air" English Air 

CLASS GIFTS 

IRENE KRAULIS JENNIE MAIEWSKI 

GERTRUDE PETRIKOSKI JANET ZUCHOWSM 

CLASS WILL 

BERNICE BUCKOWSRI, BERNARD SAWICKI, 

MARGARET VACHULA 

PIANO DUET 

"Victor Herbert Favorites" 
MARY BELDEN DOROTHEA FORTSCH 

ADDRESS TO UNDERGRADUATES 

STANLEY KIREJCZYK 

PRESENTATION OF GIFT TO SCHOOL 

ALEX WIDELO 

ACCEPTANCE OF GIFT 

CHARLES LABBEE, Junior Class President 

CLASS SONG Senior Class 

"Commencement" 

SCHOOL SONG 



SMITH ACADEMY 



13 



Address of Welcome 



We, the class of '47, bid you, our parents, 
teachers, friends and schoolmates, a most 
hearty welcome to this exercise, which 
marks another milestone in the lives of us 
graduates. Now that the long-awaited day 
has come, we look back over the days that 
we have spent in school. We realize that in 
completing our high school course we have 
achieved a stepping stone toward the fu- 
ture. We know that the education we have 
received here will serve us well in the years 
to come. We shall always remember that 



our first two years in Smith Academy were 
war years; and we are grateful, today, to 
be graduating in a peace-time year. We 
want to express gratitude to our parents 
for the opportunity we have had, and to 
the faculty for having assisted us during 
the four years that we have spent in Smith 
Academy. As we open these exercises it 
gives me great pleasure, in behalf of the 
class of '47, to bid you all a hearty WEL- 
COME! 

LEONARD KARPINSKI 



Class Statistics 



Stacia Kostek, the D. A. R. student of our class 

In studies never came last. 
In bookkeeping she always rated an A, 

She was Pro Merito, a prize speaker and took part in the play 
Dining at Toto's with her favorite date, 

You'll find Stacia entering Saturday night at eight. 

John Fortsch, a chemist would like to be, 

A prize winning speaker, and stage technician was he. 
In chemistry he always did his experiments well 

As manager of the basketball team he did excel. 
As a trumpet player, he sure knows how to blow, 

He joined the union to make more dough. 

Bernard Sawicki, tall, dark-haired lad is he, 

An actor is what he plans to be. 
In our school plays he has shown great skill, 

And as a public speaker he fills the bill. 
Good marks put him in the Pro Merito class, 

And made him salutatorian, second honors of our class. 

Leonard Karpinski, the Romeo of our class, 

Has an eye on a certain Junior lass, 
"Bookeeping's my favorite subject," he'd always say 

But when a test came, we'd find Lenny absent that day! 
As president of our class he let us each have our say 

As an actor he did well in the senior play 
And we all know he is quite a friend to Jay. 



Helen Michalowski, the busy girl at Terry's, 

Stands behind the counter and flirts with all the Jerrys. 
She waits every morning for that certain letter, 

Because with it she certainly feels better. 
In shorthand and as typist for the school paper, she did excel, 

But about U. S. History, Helen just loves to tell. 



14 PURPLE AND WHITE ECHO 

Gertrude Petrikoskj, who has beautiful blonde hair, 

In the future plans to be a millionaire. 
She's always seen in a blue sedan car, 

With Charlie, she's recognized from afar. 
In typing and bookkeeping she had great skill 

The Washington trip she thought was a thrill. 

Jennie Maiewski, our Elm Street lass, 

Rated A's in every class, 
Our valedictorian she did become, 

But at Mt. Park with Nuka she has fun. 
As editor of the school paper she did her part. 

She and Janet are never seen apart. 

Danny Fusek, the tallest of all of us, 

Is never seen riding a bus. 
For his motorcycle will take him afar, 

But to see that certain girl he takes his car. 
As a public speaker he talked with great ease, 

And between classes, the girls he found time to tease. 

Lucy Szych. the dark-haired girl of our class, 

Has quite an interest in Hadley, Mass. 
On Monday morning she complains of a headache. 

Was it Mike that kept her out Sunday night so late? 
She likes to type and did her shorthand well, 

On the basketball team and in the play she did excel 

This Valley Street girl, known to us as Benny, 

Is usually seen with her friend Rennie. 
From across the river she came full of joy, 

Leaving Hadley, she said, "Boy! Oh, Boy!" 
In prize speaking and the play, well did she do her part. 

from S. A. Bernice Buchowski hates to depart. 

Joanne Howard, so sweet and petite is she. 

In Burgy is where she'd like to be. 
English is a subject she studied so hard, 

But she always found time to write Roger a card. 
As Myra in the play she made a hit, 

As editor-in-chief she did quite a bit. 
She's seen at the square dance every Saturday night 

To Corky's music she dances with delight. 

Annette Kempisty, who hails from N. Main Street 

Thinks a certain Freddie is quite sweet. 
Basketball and science to her were really thrilling, 

Chemistry and problems are what she calls killing. 
As a Thespian and prize speaker she did very well 

Coming back from Washington, she had much to tell. 



SMITH ACADEMY 15 

Janet Zuchowski, our class model 

To Hollywood will certainly toddle. 
She'll miss Corky and the South Deerfield gang at the dances, 

But from those charming actors will get more glances. 
In S. A. with a needle she sewed many a dress, 

And to class she'd go, the teacher she would try to impress. 

Our tall and handsome senior lad, 

Leaving S. A. he is so very sad. 
When you hear laughter, you know he's around, 

It's Alex Widelo in the typing room to be found. 
In problems he always did his best, 

And worst of all were those English tests. 
As public speaker and as butler in the play, 

His work will be remembered for many a day. 

Who's the girl that thinks Hadley is tops, 

When Bob is mentioned her heart just stops. 
Why it's Peggy Vachula, our class treasurer, 

Who takes her work at S. A. with great pleasure. 
As manager of the basketball team she kept her books straight, 

In English class, Peggy liked to debate. 
She was one of the "Dangerous Ladies" in the play, 

All in all, she has been a busy girl, we'd say. 

This blonde third honor student of our class, 

On the basketball floor, he sure was fast. 
When he's alone he looks rather quiet, 

With a gang he's quite a riot. 
As President of our Junior class he did his stuff, 

It's Stanley Kirejczyk — have we said enough! 

Our glamorous shorty, and peppiest classmate, 

To bookkeeping always trotted in late. 
Polish dances, here and there, are her greatest joy, 

At White Eagle you'll find her flirting with that drumming boy. 
As a public speaker she has done very well, 

It's Irene Kraulis whose giggle from afar one can always tell. 

HELEN MICHALOWSKI 
STACIA KOSTEK 
LUCY SZYCH 



16 



PURPLE AND WHITE ECHO 



Class Prophecy 



Dear Classmates: 



The other day, while passing through 
Shutesbury, I noticed Mr. and Mrs. Stanley 
Kirejczyk walking along the Bentley Park- 
way. They look like the typical American 
family, children and all. He is employed by 
the Jay Engineering Co., mining Stupium, 
which you know propels the new cars 
which not only go backwards and forward, 
but also sideways. Stanley is getting slight- 
ly grey-haired, and the reason is that family 
life is getting the best of him. Stanley also 
believes that the housing shortage is still 
acute, for he has to spend so much time in 
the DOGHOUSE! 



Last week I met one of my former school- 
mates, Annette Kempisty. We all know that 
Annette has always had a keen interest in 
dancing. She is now employed by the Higby 
Huxley Dancing School of New York. "We 
have heard that she is going to be the 
bride of Mr. Huxley. They expect to go 
on a world tour after their marriage and 
especially to visit some of the Parisian 
dance halls to pick up a few tips. They 
are going to make the trip in a new 
FORTO-MILE-EATER rocket Ship. An- 
nette says that she likes to manipulate the 
rocket ship, for there are no telephone 
poles or trees to be moving in the skyways. 



Leonard Karpinski is the only member 
of our class who is a politician. Our distin- 
guished classmate is the governor of Ken- 
tucky. He received some valuable experi- 
ence for this work while he was a student 
in Smith Academy, for he was always one 
of the administrators of our class, but he 
finds it very hard dealing with the back- 
woodsmen of Kentucky because the only 
law that they know is, "Do what we want 
or you'll get slugged." He has the whole 
state militia as his body guards, for he is 
trying to educate and reform the ignorant 
backwoodsmen. He has been elected for a 
three-year term, and after that period he 
is sure that he will be run out of the state, 
if not the country, because of the reaction 



to his manner of conducting his reforms. 
We all wish Leonard the best of luck and 
we are sure that he will need it. 



You have all undoubtedly seen The Mod- 
erne Fashion Shop on Fifth Avenue. The 
lucky owner and proprietor is Miss Jennie 
Maiewski. Jennie is using all the skill and 
knowledge that she attained at Smith Acad- 
emy, in operating her business so success- 
fully. She has ten fashion designers work- 
ing for her, and her business is steadily 
improving. One of the reasons that her 
business is such a success is that fashions 
change weekly instead of yearly, as they 
did in '47. Miss Maiewski is living the life 
of a queen, for she owns a large new home 
in Long Island. Her new home is made of 
the new Fortsch-perfected plastic that 
changes from clear in the day time to dark 
brown in the evening. 



By the way, last week I was in New 
York when a peculiar thing happened. As I 
was standing on the platform, the New 
York Bus pulled up with a jerk. I boarded 
the bus, glanced at the driver, and to my 
surprise, who was driving it but Rene 
Kraulis! Still, with these new Fusek Model 
Busses featuring the "Scotch" Gear Shift 
which makes the car shiftless, ANYONE 
can drive. As the bus became more crowded, 
her sweet feminine voice came floating 
down the aisle, "Corner of Toid and Toidy- 
toid, all joiks out!" 

Saying good-by to Irene Kraulis. I got 
off at the next stop, which was Jo Howard 
Field. As I entered the ticket office and 
administration building of the Howard Fly- 
ing Service, the first thing I noticed was 
a large sign which read, "Howard Flying 
Service, Joanne Howard, Manager." When 
I saw the name Joanne Howard. I wondered 
whether this was the same Howard that 
had graduated from S. A. in 1947. Curi- 
osity got the better of me, so I knocked 
on the large, oak door of the office. Present- 
ly I heard a familiar voice say. "Come in." 
Sure enough, it was Joanne Howard. Miss 
Howard started out in '47 as a stewardess 



SMITH ACADEMY 



17 



for the Pan-American Airways, but de- 
cided that she would rather be in business 
for herself. As a result, she now owns How- 
ard Field and one hundred and fifty planes. 
When I looked out of the window of the 
office I noticed that the plane for Hatfield 
was getting ready to leave, so I had to 
conclude my chat with Joanne Howard, a 
classmate in '47 at Smith Academy. 

***** 

Empire State Building- 
New York City 
June 15, 1957 
Dear Classmates: 

I received your invitation to the class 
reunion today and am happy to announce 
that I will attend. I will arrive on the 
10:30 train at the Hatfield Station. 

I shall leave my photography shop in the 
care of my five able assistants, who are 
now busily engaged with the photos of stu- 
dents on their class trips. Do you recollect 
our class trip, when I took three good pic- 
tures from two rolls of film? Well! I have 
improved, and now get five good pictures 
from two rolls of film. 

Be seeing you soon, 

Bernard Sawicki. 



Fenway Park 
Boston Red Sox 
June 14, 1957 
Dear Chairman: 

With deepest regret I inform you that I 
will not be able to attend the reunion of 
the class of '47. As you probably know, 
I am busily engaged in my position as right 
fielder for the Red Sox. 

Tell my classmates that they are cordi- 
ally invited to be guests of my wife and 
me at my summer home on Martha's Vine- 
yard during the week of June 25. 
Yours truly, 
Alexander "Cupie" Widelo. 



New York Tribune June 7, 1957 

Flash — Famous Woman Detective Breaks 

Up Deadliest Spy Ring In History. 

"At twelve o'clock last night along the 

New York waterfront a submarine was 



waiting. Out of the dark alley came four 
men ready to shoot at anything. Then, out 
of nowhere a woman's voice yelled, "Halt, 
or we'll shoot!" The spies found themselves 
surrounded by the police, headed by Bernice 
Buckowski." ... It goes on to say, "Miss 
Buckowski, in her gun battle with the 
leader of the saboteurs, the much heard of 
Hawknose Kerchkilloff, was seriously 
wounded. She is now confined to the "Curlup 
and Dye" hospital on Zombie Boulevard, 
New York City, N. Y." . . . That means she 
certainly won't be here at the reunion. We 
must send her a card. 



Hey, Fortschie and Annette, did you hear 
about Dan Fusek winning the motorcycle 
race at the Nutsville Speedway last week? 
I also heard that he had invented a new 
kind of motorcycle which has a speed of 
150 miles an hour. This is a big difference 
from the time when he first learned to 
ride a motorbike, and tried to put it in 
reverse. Those were the days, huh, Dan? 

***** 

Here's a letter from Helen Michalowski 
Thibault. Did you know that her husband 
is the new swoon king of the teen-agers ? 
He is on a tour now and Helen says here 
that she plans to attend the reunion. Oh, 
listen to this! She's got a helicopter and 
will land right on the roof of the Waldorf! 
Happy landing, Helen. 



Park Avenue 

New York City 
Dear Classmates: 

Just a few words to say I'm sorry that I 
won't be able to come to the reunion June 
19. I know you will think it strange, my 
being in New York and not coming, but it 
is quite impossible. You see, my two daugh- 
ters, Lucy I and Lucy II, my son Lucien 
and I are making our debut at Carnegie 
Hall the very night of the reunion. Lucy I, 
who is nine years old, plays the piano and 
she really does a wonderful job. Lucy II, 
just eight years old, plays the violin; and 
Lucien, who is five, does a nice job on the 
bass fiddle. Of course you know that I am 
going to sing. I have another son, Mike Jr., 



18 



PURPLE AND WHITE ECHO 



who much against my will insists upon mas- 
tering the harmonica instead of the harp. 
The twins, Maggie and Trudy, who are just 
two years old, I know will be musically 
inclined just as I am, for already they are 
humming little tunes. 

You must come down and visit us some 
time, for you have never met my husband 
Mike, have you? My friends all say that 
only Mike Jr. takes after his father, for 
he certainly isn't a bit interested in music. 

Please come any time. 

Your classmate, 
Lucille. 



Joanne, you remember Jack Fortsch, that 
scientific genius who was in our class? If 
you recall, when we were about juniors in 
high school he used to experiment with a 
chemistry set, doing quite a job on his 
fingers. At least, he told everyone he was 
only experimenting with his set. But yes- 
terday I came upon the most interesting 
article about him. He was one of the men 
who was on the committee working on the 
atomb bomb eleven years ago. And his 
poor, poor family! Jack finally succeeded in 
making a rocket ship, which incidentally he 
has named the S. A. So, with the aid of this 
new ship, he has made numerous trips to 
the moon and — of all things — has built his 
new home there! And speaking of a scienti- 
fic way of thinking, he refers to his children 
as his "five little elements." And the names 
they have: Arsenic, Atom Manganese, 
Uranium, Europeum, Chlorine! Wonder 
where Atom comes in? 



Janets Hills 
Janetsville, Hollywood 
Dear Friends: 

I'm so truly, truly sorry, but I'm afraid 
it'll be quite impossible for me to come 
to the reunion. It's so truly, truly excit- 
ing, for today is my wedding day! The 
lucky man is Peter Lorre, my dancing part- 
ner. Darling Peter insists on adopting the 
most darling children you've ever seen. 
I think their names are the Katzinjamer 
Kids. They're such two darling boys. Abso- 
lute Angels! 



I suppose you've heard that Beverly 
Hills has been renamed. They insist on 
naming them after me, so now It's Janets 
Hills, Janetsville, Hollywood. Bother, bother 
to have such great fame! 

I must be closing now, for I'm truly, 
truly such a busy little girl. 
Always, 

Janet Zuchowski Lorre. 



1 will read you this letter from Gertie 
Petrikoski. I believe that she's married now. 

Oh, yes! 
Dear Classmates: 

I am planning to attend the reunion at 
the Waldorf, June 19th. 

My daughter Annie and I are modeling 
for the Hies Model Agency here in Hics- 
ville. Charlie Jr. is taking over the tobacco 
ranch in South Deerfield, Massachusetts, 
while my husband is visiting in the South 
Seas Islands. I go under the name of 
Blondie June Glamourette while modeling. 

I can't wait to see you all at the reunion. 

Sincerely, 
Gertrude Petrikoski Bohonowicz. 



River Drive 
Hadley, Mass. 

Dear Friends: 

Only a few lines about our reunion. I 
hope you'll all forgive me for not coming, 
but I know you'll understand. I must stay 
home and help my hubbie pick asparagus, 
apples and strawberries. Also, there is sim- 
ply no one to work in that darn old post 
office. And why does Junior always have 
hallucinations when there is so much work 
to be done? Oh yes, I didn't tell you that 
we have a daughter Roberta, Jr., named 
after her father. I knew we should have 
named her after me, for then she might 
have taken after me in all her ways, in- 
stead of her father. It would help so much. 
Of course, I can't put all the blame of 
spoiling our daughter on my husband, for 
I certainly didn't help in bringing her up 
to be a good little girl. My husband is try- 
ing to make this up to me now by getting 
me a nurse, but I simply refuse to have 



SMITH ACADEMY 



19 



a stranger bringing up my daughter. 

All of you must be simply bored listen- 
ing to my troubles, so I'll close now hoping 
that you will come down to visit us some- 
time. Please call or write before you come, 
for I might be out picking apples or straw- 
berries and might miss you. Have a good 
time at the reunion. 



Your classmate, 



Peggy. 



Flatbush Avenue, 
Hicksticks. Term. 
Dear Fellow Class Members: 

I received your kind invitation and was 
exceedingly overjoyed. Although the "via 
mule" mail is rather slow here, I received 



your special delivery air mail-collected 
letter in good time — two short months. 

My school's enrollment is rapidly in- 
creasing from last year's three up to a big 
five! Intellectual desires are rising too. 
From ancient Slang, to Moderne Slang, a 
streamlined-'57 hog-call, a new "moonshine" 
system which even the revenuers can't lo- 
cate, and of course — a revised crossticker 
course in Bookkeeping. 

I shall depart for New York City in 
my Atom Whizzer buggy, and be with you 
in time for the reunion. 

Stacia. 

ANNETTE KEMPISTY 
JOANNE HOWARD 
DANIEL FUSEK 
JOHN FORTSCH 



Class Will 



Be it remembered (as if we could be 
forgotten) that we, the Class of '47 of 
Smith Academy in the Commonwealth of 
Masscahusetts, being of sound mind and 
memory, but knowing the uncertainties of 
this life, do make this our LAST WILL 
AND TESTAMENT, hereby revoking all 
former wills by us at any time heretofore 
made. (Will all the Wills in the house 
please leave?) 

After the payment of our just debts and 
funeral charges — graduation, that is — we 
bequeath and devise as follows: 

Gertrude Petrikoski — leaves her "now- 
needless" bus tickets to Deerfield to Irene 
Maciorowski. who seems to have interests 
there. P.S. "Rocket" tickets to Hadley are 
now being sought by Gertie. 

Daniel Fusek — leaves a half pint bottle 
of kickapoo juice to Martin Holich, in order 
to run his jet-propelled motorcycle, while 
Danny is busy on the planet Venus, filling 
a mechanic's vacancy. 

Janet Zuchowski — leaves her sister Fran- 
ces her flirtatious smile and exclusive tech- 
nique of meeting so-o-o many boys during 
one Saturday night Square Dance. 

Stanley Kirejczyk — leaves Carole Howard 
all his chemistry and French papers, so, 



that she can spend her evenings with him 
instead of pondering over books. (We are 
all sure that Carole will take great advan- 
tage of this opportunity.) 

Margaret Vachula — leaves to the next 
chemistry class a one-hundred-pound bag 
of sodium chloride — salt to you — in payment 
for the apparatus that she so mysteriously 
demolished during experiment periods. (A 
one-pound box is the usual fee for breaking 
lab equipment.) 

Bernice Buckowski — leaves to Charles 
Labbee all her fatal excuses for being ab- 
sent, so that Coggy can better them and 
succeed more often in having his excuses 
accepted. 

Leonard Karpinski — Lenny bequeaths to 
his beloved brother Richard, his position as 
president of the class, and a most-needed 
photographer for class pictures to be taken, 
so there will be no question about where 
to go. 

Lucy Szych — leaves to Esther Carter her 
typing skills and the Royal typewriter lo- 
cated in Row 1, Seat 3, so Esther can do 
as well as Lou did on a good typewriter. 

Joanne Howard — leaves to her friend, 
Virginia Yarrows, all the fun and excite- 



20 



PURPLE AND WHITE ECHO 



ment of being popular at the Square Dances 
with those Burgy Hillbillys. We hope, Vir- 
ginia, that you will take very good care 
of them, as Jo did. 

Annette Kempisty — bequeaths to Ethel 
Omasta the joy of being called a "Blonde 
Bombshell" by everyone; not only at school, 
but also by those laddies at the Square 
Dances. 

Stacia Kostek — leaves to Laura Pelc, a 
demure, quiet Junior lass, the expectation 
for the thrills of going on the Washington 
trip and having a wonderful time. Only one 
bit of advice, Laura, don't decide to not like 
studying when you come back. 

Alex Widelo — leaves to his brother Bobby 
the gun used in "Dangerous Ladies," which 
had trouble going off. We hope that when 
Bobby uses it, the gun will prove to be 
more successful. 

Irene Kraulis — leaves to Nancy Holly all 
the candy bars, icebergs, apples and all-day 
suckers she could not eat while at Smith 
Academy, in the hope that Nancy will 
finish them. We hope over-eating will not 
affect Nancy too much. 

John Fortsch — thankfully gets rid of his 
most combustile chemistry set, leaving it to 
anyone who is tired of living. May the 
recipient rest in peace! 

Helen Michalowski — graciously donates 
her cute giggle to Janet Vollinger, so that 
Janet can cheer up and be as happy as 
Helen always is. 

Jennie Maiewski — leaves to Dorothy 
Skarzynski all the worries and troubles of 
getting school paper and yearbook material 
collected on time. We feel sure that Dorothy 
will carry on as well as Jennie managed. 

Bernard Sawicki — leaves all the addresses 
of his fellow stamp collectors all over the 
woi'ld to the sophomore girls, so that they 
need have no fear of running short of pen 
pals. 

Principal Jakobek — We of the Senior 
Class think we'd like to leave our worthy 
principal, in appreciation of his endeavors 
during the past n ; ne months, a new Z-13 
speedboat, fully equipped with heater and 
radio, to insure comfort, so that he can use 



the Connecticut River as a short cut to 
S. A., since his "Plymouth is on the verge 
of collapse, and won't be able to endure 
those long trips all the way from Hadley 
to Hatfield for the next school year. 

To Mrs. Pruzynski — Since you have been 
having trouble with your car. Mrs. Pruzy r n- 
ski, we have for you a super muffler, guar- 
anteed to last forever. Now the students 
will not be able to hear you come down 
the street. 

Mrs. Muller — To Mrs. Muller we bequeath 
a special hand-bag radar set, to aid her in 
locating the future French and Latin 
A.W.O.L.'S. 

Mrs. Day — To Mrs. Day, our Home Eco- 
nomics teacher, we leave a robot-controlled 
helicopter to replace her slightly dilapidated 
limousine. It appears to be undergoing 
SUCH a heavy strain when filled with S. A. 
girls that one is forced to look twice at 
SUCH SUCHNESS. 

Mrs. O'Neill— To Mrs. O'Neill we leave 
a carton of freshly concocted bubble gum, 
which is guaranteed to produce extra-large 
bubbles. Now Mrs. O'Neill can keep in 
rhythm with the next Junior's "Chawing — 
Blowing Club." 

The French 3 class leaves Mrs. Muller a 

"hot-off-the-press" edition of the hair-sav- 
ing "Frentogenuloskijapolia-English" book, 
in order that she may translate that newly- 
discovered language used by her French 
and Latin psycho-cases. 

Mr. Symancyk — to Mr. Symancyk we 
leave a more intelligent Problems class, so 
that when he is talking about J. Edgar 
Hoover no one will be of the opinion that 
the subject of the day is Dick Tracy's latest 
escapade. 

Miss Ryan — to Miss Ryan, our patient 
home room teacher, we leave a new senior 
class with the hope that she does not get 
as many gray hairs from the new class as 
she did from us. 

To the Faculty as a whole we leave a life 
supply of assorted colors of boot polish to 
patch up those whitened streaks of hair. Is 
it possible that we innocent ones have has- 
tened the work of old Mother Nature? 



SMITH ACADEMY 



21 



To the Freshman Class we leave a seven- 
cent bank account. We wish to have them 
financially supplied before they become 
Seniors. 

Sophomores — We leave to the sophomore 
class all the headaches of public speaking, 
the jitters of prize speaking night, and the 
relief when it's all over. May they survive 
as well as we, when we spoke. 

To the Junior Class — We of the Senior 
Class leave our successors nothing but ad- 



vice to study hard and to try to graduate 
without too much trouble a procedure which 
we Seniors wish we had followed. 

We hereunto set our hand and seal to this 
Testament, this eighteenth day of June, in 
the year of our Lord one thousand nine hun- 
dred and forty-seven. 

MARGARET VACHULA 
BERNICE BUCKOWSKI 
BERNARD SAWICKI 



Class Gifts 



BERNICE BUCHOWSKI— We feel sure 
that in the future Bernice will be a very 
successful police-woman. Just so that you 
will be able to handle those outlaws, Bern- 
ice, we are giving you this gun, so that 
you can practice upon your target shoot- 
ing and always be prepared. Lord have 
mercy on the outlaws! 

JOHN FORTSCH— When we needed help to 
present a movie we called for "Fortschie." 
When we wanted someone to set up the 
microphone, we called for "Fortschie"; 
and when we needed a chauffeur to take 
us out-of-town trips, we called for Forts- 
chie". Therefore, for his generous service 
to Smith Academy, we make our first 
down payment of one cent for "Fortschi" 
— all we have left in the treasury — and 
an I.O.U. to cover the balance. 

DAN FUSEK— As we all know, Dan has 
a very keen interest in the mechanisms 
of a car, so to aid him along the road to 
success, we have this littTe tool kit, which 
contains a file, a saw, a club, and a bottle 
of Kilroy Nitric Acid! 

ANNETTE KEMPISTY and JOANNE 
HOWARD— To both Annette and Joanne, 
who, on the Washington trip, were caught 
star-gazing into the eyes of three Span- 
iards, we present Spanish vocabulary 
books. I'm sure these books will come in 
handy for their future correspondence. 
South America, take it away! 

LEONARD KARPINSKI— To Lenny we are 
giving a jar of cold cream. Don't you 
remember how, on our class trip, poor 



Lenny had such trouble with chapped 
lips? And how he kept knocking on the 
girls' doors at night, asking for some cold 
cream? Now, Lenny, you won't have to 
bother any one for cold cream — here's 
some all your own. 

STANLEY KIERJCZYK— To Stanley, we 
proudly present this bottle of Jergen's 
lotion, so that his hands will be smooth 
and soft whenever he holds hands in the 
moonlight with a certain girl. 

STACIA KOSTEK— Stacia has proved to 
us that she is a secretary supreme: But 
in case you should make a mistake in 
your business career, here is a bottle of 
ink eradicator. However, we hope you 
don't have to resort to it too often. 

IRENE KRAULIS— We give our petite 
Rene these Adler Elevated Shoes. Now, 
when she goes dancing, these shoes will 
add height and a stately charm, and that 
six footer won't have to bend so far. 

JENNIE MAIEWSKI— For Jennie, our 
valedictorian, who has spent four years 
in perpetual study, we have this medal of 
honor. This medal certifies that you, Jen- 
nie, are sentenced to a life of leisure, and 
now that S. A. days are over, may you 
rest in everlasting peace. 

HELEN MICHALOWSKI— Helen is all set 
for the future, it seems. We know you'll 
make a very cute soda jerk, Helen, so 
we're going to prepare you, should an 



22 



PURPLE AND WHITE ECHO 



emergency arise! Here is a bottle opener, 
just in case the one at Terry's goes on 
strike. 

GERTRUDE PETRIKOSKI— It seems that 
Gertrude has been walking around in a 
trance ever since the Washington trip. A 
closer investigation revealed to us that 
she has lost her heart in Washington. So, 
for Gertrude, we have here an airplane to 
take her back to dreamland, deep in the 
heart of Washington. 

BERNARD SAWICKI— A nice row boat is 
your gift, Bernie. When your car is rest- 
ing from the night before, you may use 
this row boat to cross the Conecticut 
River and see the blond model from Had- 
ley, whom you met while on the class trip. 

LUCY SZYCH— We know it's hard for Lucy 
to make dates, over the neighbor's tele- 
phone, with that celebrated personage 
from Hadley. So to you, Lucy, we give 
this telephone, so that you may enjoy 
hour-long chats with that certain man, 
instead of having to hang up in just 

twenty minutes. 



MARGARET VACHULA— Since it looks as 
if Peg is going to follow in her sister's 
footsteps, we want to present her with 
this J. R. Wood art-carved diamond ring, 
to help matters a bit, since that North 
Hadley lad is so shy. Good luck, Peg! 

ALEX WIDELO— As many of you know. 
Alex was heard uttering some of the 
queerest noises during the study periods, 
and it grot so that uttering them became 
a favorite pastime with him. Therefore, 
in order that he may never fail to be a 
noise-maker, we present him with this 
brand new rattle. 

JANET ZUCHOWSKI— During her Senior 
year. Janet has been seen in and out of 
town in some of the latest model cars 
such as the Studebaker, the Oldsmobile, 
or the Pontiac. Therefore, to refresh her 
memory when she is at home, we jrive to 
Janet this beautiful new Studebaker. 

JENNIE MAIEWSKI 
IRENE KRAULIS 
JANET ZUCHOWSKI 
CKRTRUDE PETKIKOWSKI 



SMITH ACADEMY 



23 



Address to Undergraduates 



It is a great privilege and honor to ad- 
dress you, undergraduates, in behalf of 
the class of '47. When Smith Academy 
welcomed us, back in 1943, as freshmen, the 
world was engaged in a bitter struggle that 
pitted all free men against the cruel forces 
of fascism. As we progressed in years, the 
world shook off the clutches of fascism to 
restore peace. Now, it is up to us, as Amer- 
icans, to keep the peace of the future. 

Smith Academy has helped prepare us for 
this future. The teachers have helped us 
lay the foundation of our lives, which must 
be planned as the erection of a great build- 
ing is planned. They have shown us that 
our foundation must rest upon eight pillars, 
important in attaining success whether in 
the problem of making a living, or serving 
the community, or keeping world peace. 
These pillars are energy, economy, inte- 
grity, sympathy, impartiality, system, sin- 
cerity, and self-reliance. Now that these 
are cemented together, we have a solid 
foundation for the life we shall continue to 
build as we go forth into the future. 

Tomorrow, we shall be on our own. No 
more shall we be able to rely on our teach- 
ers to help us in our problems. Since Smith 
Academy has given us our foundation, it 
is up to every individual who is graduating 
today and to every one of you who will 
graduate in the near future to make what 
he wishes of himself. We all probably shall 
scatter to the four corners of the earth and 
may not see each other for a long time, or 
even forever. As the future citizens of this 
great democracy, it is up to us and to you, 
undergraduates, to take a hand in helping 



preserve peace for our country and for 
the world. Why, even now, we are trou- 
bled within our borders by a new threat, 
Communism. Smith Academy will help pre- 
pare you, as it has prepared us, to battle 
this threat and any other threat which tries 
to upset our freedom, whether it is from an 
external or from an internal source. So, 
undergraduates, don't waste your time in 
school; and make the most of your oppor- 
tunities. 

Juniors — You have but one more year to 
complete your high school education. Make 
the most of that year. Get a good founda- 
tion for your future years. Develop your 
capacities to their fullest extent. Set your 
goal and drive with all your might for it. 
Lay well the foundations. 

Sophomores — Half of your high school 
life is completed. Now is the time to decide 
what course you wish to take and stick to 
it. Do not waste a single moment, for you 
will find later that you will be sorry. 

Freshmen — You have the longest road to 
travel. Since peace is here again, you can 
lead a normal life. But life will be difficult, 
as you will discover. Take courses to suit 
your needs and then bear down and follow 
them through. Always remember that suc- 
cess is not achieved easily, but with much 
labor. 

To all of you, the class of '47 extends 
loads of luck and best wishes. We hope that 
you will enjoy school life as much as we 
have. We hope that the future will hold 
in store many good things for you. 

STANLEY F. KIREJCZYK, 
Third Honor Student. 



* 



Presentation of Gift to School 



With the passing of tomorrow, the mem- 
bers of the class of 1947 will join the 
ranks of alumni. We are leaving Smith 
Academy at a time when education is of 
great importance. The education that we 
have received here will help us greatly in 
the years to come. In grateful appreciation, 



we leave this gift, a sum of money, to be 
used for the school library. We hope this 
gift will not only serve to keep alive our 
memory, but will also serve as a token of 
our appreciation of the vital education that 
Smith Academy has given us. 

ALEX WIDELO 



24 PURPLEANDWHITEECHO 



They"ll Never Forget 



Bernice Buchowski coming to school three days in a row 

John Fortsch his exploding experiments 

Danny Fusek correcting the instructor in chemistry 

Joanne Howard having fun at the square dances 

Leonard Karpinski getting a long distance call from Vanties' in Boston 

Annette Kempisty coming to school at nine 

Stanley Kirejczyk . . on the chemistry class tour of the Pi'o-phy-lac-tic Brush Co. 

Stacia Kostek picked as D.A.R. girl 

Irene Kraulis eating in H. A. 

Jennie Maiewski the many hours of endless study 

Helen Michalowski working in the "shop" after school 

Gertrude Petrikoski the many moonlight nights 

Bernard Sawicki "Lola" on the Washington trip 

Lucy Szych wearing pig-tails to school 

Peggy Vachula moonlight rides on N. Hadley Pond 

Alex Widelo making gruesome noises in study hall 

Janet Zuchowski South Deerhcld (men) 



Senior Auto 



Headlights JENNIE MAIEWSKI. BERNARD SAWICKI Extra Bright 

Rear Light BERNICE BUCKOWSKI Always Out 

Wheels STACIA KOSTEK, LUCY SZYCH Lively People 

HELEN MICHALOWSKI. JOANNE HOWARD 

Spotlight PEGGY VACHULA On the beam 

Gas GERTRUDE PETRIKOSKI Always burned up 

Spare Tire JANET ZUCHOWSKI Comes in handy 

Engine JOHN FORTSCH Forever blowing up 

Roof DANNY FUSEK Way above 

Windshield Wiper ANNETTE KEMPISTY Never works 

Horn LENNY KARPINSKI Always blowing 

Seat STANLEY KIREJCZYK Always getting sat on 

(By a blonde) 

Siren ALEX WIDELO Makes unheard of noises 

Gas Tank IRENE KRAULIS Consumes in quantities 

Body - Students 

Brakes Don't know what they are 

Choke Faculty 

Driver Mr. Jakobek — tries to steer 



SMITH ACADEMY 



25 



0> 
CL 

o 
u 












50 








c 








o 
















-p 


to 






to 


(A 






o> 


41 






3 


s 






cr 


it 






to be 


01 


10 

03 


to 

."2 


o .S 
o -g 




EH 


«: 


a <* 



it 
3 



o 



to >> 

0) -^ 

a? 



to in 

.2 * 

ft to 

ft ft 

< p 



S3 
o 

ft J 

S "* 

to ^J o ^ O 

I ? f K f 



O oj 
£ P 



o 


0> to 




r5 

3 


JS 




O > Fh 






03 


to 


Firecra 
Explosi 
New ca 




bfi 


°* «.„ 


o 
o 

o 

co 


to 

+j 
to 

0) 

fa 


_g 

-p 

o> 

o 


S3 be 

>,.s 

03 X! 
CO (3 



o ^ 

^ T3 

-° C 

5X1 rt 

.5 -2 

0) 03 

pq o 



» 



CO % "£ W 4S .a 



o fi 

. s-j Ol "" 



3 ,2 

be o 


o 


o 

c 


cS 
01 


T3 


T3 


c 


Suo 






o 




tf 


01 


5fi rC 


'3 S 

s s 


0) 

o 


3 


" ft 


o! +-> 


SH 


rv 


O Qj 


Q <! 


M 


co 


W EH 



33 to 

to o> 

.£ la 



bJO ^5 .5 



o3 EH 



.2 

'o 
cs 

T3 



to 2 

>ȣ 

fn O) 



o 


X) 


to 


u 


a; 


A 


01 


>> 




Ph 


o 


Tl 


01 


a 




fi 


c 


fir 


0) 


cj 


c 




be J3 




a 


»j 


r 




Cfl 


01 

> 


n 


£ 



SH be be be 
g .g „ C 

to -p i£ 'S 



-03.^ 



be £ 



be j^ 



ft o> 

n> EH 



.2 S 
T3 3 



-a 

C3 B 



s W 

be 2 ^5 ^ 
e "C be to 



_ « 

be o3 






MWHHfeOQOWOTmaOUcoO 



•43 .2 


03 


o> - 


^3 


4J Ol 




o> x 




P O 


S 



> 


H !h 




S 


0) 


+3 


f 3 ^ 

2 « 


c3 

o> 


# ff3 

"3 


Ol 

s 




o3 y 


o 


01 


^ 


X 


r^i Cfl 


0> 


•t-H 


01 


w 


o m 


W 


P 


fa 



03 ,0) 
73 tl 
O 



ft 3 

03 to 

^ Ol 

o *a 
a) 



« .H 3 U (J 
© b> —' +" M 
CQ {? PL, CQ W 



to 


TJ 


to 

a 


to Pa 


5-3 


Ol fe 

fa w 

is 


ft 

03 

M 

T3 


te Kemp 
y Kirejc 
Kostek 




03 
C 


C S O 


J« ^3 


o 


3 c3 c3 
3 +-> +-> 


01 O 




pq >-5 


P Hj 


►J 


<< CO CQ 



.22 ^ "3 
S o> 



to O 
P H 



r2 
P 

o 

03 
> 



»1 

o> -^ 
•ai 3 

W o 



H XJ1 

°3 . 

S3 >» 

u Si 

oi p 

cq P 



ai oi 

u to tR 

> ^ » 

to s W 

to" ^S ^ 

O P co 



03 £ 

a 



A! 
ca 

5 I 

Ol rG 

12 3 

^ N 

X a; 
oi C 
■— J 03 



26 



PURPLE AND WHITE ECHO 



Class Song 

"COMMENCEMENT DAY" 

By Churchill and Grendell 

Here at the crossroads we're standing 

Viewing - the years that have gone, 

Years that have been swift and fleeting, 

Joyful with laughter and song. 

Far ahead stretches the futures, 

Wonderful mystic of youth 

Bright with her promise eternal, 

Bright with her promise of truth. 

Farewell classmates, teachers adieu — 

Here at the crossroads 

We must part from you. 

Hope calls us onward, 

Bidding us to be true — 

But memory binds us ever 

To deal- S. A. and you. 



Class Poem 



SMITH ACADEMY 

We leave these rooms, the friendly halls 
The stately building with red brick walls 
In »hose rooms, from days of yore 
Many feet have trod the floor. 
Here students work, a busy band. 
When the sessions are at hand. 
Here teachers smooth the rough hard way 
With added help, from day to day. 
Through each corridor one may hear 
The passing- bells ring out so clear. 
And the water fountains sing a tune 
Of our leaving here in June. 
Bright mem'ries will to us recall 
Friendships shared with one and all. 
Our life work, our own vocation, 
Is built upon this education. 
We leave these rooms, the friendly halls, 
The stately building with red brick walls. 
We leave, to go our separate ways 
With mem'ries bright of S. A. days. 

JENNIE MAIEWSKI '47 
Valedictorian 



CLASS COLORS 
Purple and White 



MOTTO 
B what you R 



CLASS FLOWER 
Purple and White Carnations 



SMITH ACADEMY 



27 



Student Council 




Front Row: Margaret Vachula, Ted Besko, Stanley Kirejczyk, Bernice Buckowski. 
Back Row: Virginia Yarrows, George Coor, Frank Kochan, Mrs. Day. 



* * * 



STUDENT COUNCIL OFFICERS 



President — Stanley Kirejczyk 
Treasurer — Ted Besko 



Vice President — Margaret Vachula 
Secretary — Bernice Buckowski 



28 



PURPLE AND WHITE ECHO 



School Paper Staff 




Front Row: Barbara Ryan, Annette Kempisty, Bernice Buckowski Margaret Vachula, 

Jennie Maiewski, Joanne Howard, Evelyn Kacinski, Dorothy Skarzinski, Ethel 
Omasta, Carol Levitre. 

Second Row: Mrs. Pruzinski, Carol Howard, Helen Szewczyk, Lucy Szych, Frances 

Zuchowski, Jeannette Niewinski, Miss Ryan. 

Back Row: Stacia Kostek. Edward Betsold. Stanley Kirejczyk, Francis Dugal, Helen 
Michalowski. 



SCHOOL PAPER STAFF 

Co-Editors Joanne Howard. Margaret Vachula, Jennie Maiewski 

Associate Editors Dorothy Skarzynski, Evelyn Kacinski 

Literary Editors Annette Kempisty. Barbara Ryan. Jeannette Niewinski 

Sports Writers Stanley Kirejczyk. Patricia Mullins 

Art Editors Janet Zuchowski. Edward Betsold 

Feature Editors Bernice Buckowski. Francis Dusral 

Business Managers Bernard Sawicki. John Foster. Leonard Karpinski 

Typists Lucy Szych. Ethel Omasta. Helen Szewczyk. 

Helen Micholowski. Esther Carter 

Reporters Virginia Yarrows. Frances Zuchowski. Carol Levitre, 

Joseph Szych, Stacia Kostek. Carole Howard. Edward Slycz 



SMITH ACADEMY 



29 



Junior Class 




Front Row: Janet Matusiewicz, Laura Pelc, Evelyn Cackowski, Frances Zuchowski, 
Ethel Omasta, Charles Labbee, John Foster, Jeanette Niewinski, Helen Szewczyk, 
Evelyn Kacinski, Esther Carter, Dorothy Skarzinski. 

Back Row: Bernard Wendolowski, Frank Kochan, Carl Pelc, Teddy Besko, Carl 
Nartowicz, Carl Majesky, Richard Karpinski, Francis Dugal, Joseph Porada, Mrs. 
O'Neill. 

Not in Picture: Richard Jandzinski. 



JUNIOR CLASS OFFICERS 



President — Charles Labbee 
Treasurer — Edward Betsold 



Vice President — John Foster 
Secretary — Jeannette Niewinski 



30 



PURPLE AND WHITE ECHO 



Sophomore Class 




Front Row: Nancy Holley, Irene Macioroski, Teresa Nartowicz, Barbara Ryan. Roger 
Wendoloski, Edward Betsold, Josephine Foster, Carole Howard, Frances Woodward. 
Katherine O'Neal. 

Back Row: Pauline Vachula, Mildred Toczko, Lucy Zawacki, John Kovalski, Thomas 
Smith, Alvin Rejniak, Robert Breor, Patricia Mullins. Virginia Yarrows. Mrs. 
Florence Muller. 

Not in Picture: Alice Cybulski. 



SOPHOMORE CLASS OFFICERS 



President — Roger Wendoloski 



Secretary — Barbara Ryan 



Treasurer — Edward Betsold 



SMITH ACADEMY 



31 



Freshman Class 




Front Row: Mary Belden, Carol Levitre, Dorothy Fortsch, Robert Wi delo, Robert 
Sadlowski, Raymond Jenness, Joseph Klekot, Joan Moriarty, Helen Backiel, Phyllis 
Pelis. 

Back Row: Ann Kennedy, Francis Holhut, Donald Holt, Leonard Klekot, Joseph Szych, 
John Barrett, George Coor, Antoinette Nielson. 

Not in Picture: Edward Slycz, Janet Vollinger. 



FRESHMAN CLASS OFFICERS 



President — Raymond Jenness 
Treasurer — Robert Widelo 



Vice President — Bernard Saydlowski 
Secretary — Carol Levitre 



32 



PURPLE AND WHITE ECHO 



Boys' Basketball 




Front Row: Carl Pelc, Stanley Kirejczyk, Captain John Foster. Ted Besko, Bernard 

Wendoloski. 
Back Row: Manager John Fortsch, John Kovalski, Coach John Symancyk, Leonard 

Klekot, Assistant Manager Alex Widelo. 



Through graduation, Smith's '47 basket- 
ball squad lost four regulars which greatly 
weakened the team both in material and 
height. The regulars lost were Bernard 
Kacenski, Bob Pelc, Bill Mullins, and Joe 
Blyda. S.A. also lost Archie Proulx and 
Myron Sikorski, both of whom left school. 
Despite the fact that the hoopsters wen' 
not bolstered with reserves or height, they 
gave all they had for their dear Old Mater. 

Smith Academy's '47 basketball club was 
composed of "Corner" Wendelowski and 
Carl Pelc as forwards; Stan Kirejczyk, cen- 
ter; and John Foster and Ted Besko, guards. 
In reserve, S.A. had John Kovalski and Leo 
Klekot. 

Coach Symancyk's lads showed three 
games in the win column, and the rest in 
the lost column for their season record. 
S.A.'s wins came in Hampshire League com- 
petition as they defeated Arms Academy. 
41 to 27, Smith School, 41-39, in a thrilling- 
overtime tilt, and finally Amherst, 36-31 



in a stunning upset. 
Summary: 

Independent Games 



Smith Academy .">:; 
Smith Academy 20 
Smith Academy 21 
Smith Academy 41 
Smith Academy 2-"> 
Smith Academy 41 



Springfield Tech 66 

St. Michael's 4:', 

Northampton 59 

St. Michael's 57 

West Springfield 5!) 

Northampton 88 





Hampshi 


ire L 


league Contests 




Smith 


Academy 


24 


Smith School 


44 


Smith 


Academy 


41 


Arms 


27 


Smith 


Academy 


29 


Amherst 


74 


Smith 


Academy 


22 


Hopkins 


31 


Smith 


Academy 


22 


Deerfield 


45 


Smith 


Academy 


40 


South Hadley 


64 


Smith 


Academy 


41 


Smith School 


39 


Smith 


Academy 


28 


Arms 


38 


Smith 


Academy 


36 


Amherst 


31 


Smith 


Academy 


35 


Hopkins 


49 


Smith 


Academy 


20 


Deerfield 


41 


Smith 


Academy 


45 


South Hadley 


60 



SMITH ACADEMY 



33 



Soccer Team 




Front Row: John Fortsch, Carl Pelc, Stanley Kirejczyk, John Foster, Alex Widelo, 

Leonard Klekot, Bernard Wendolowski. 
Back Row: Teddy Besko, Richard Jandzinski, John Kovalski, Carl Majesky, John 

Barrett, Joseph Kirejczyk, Coach Symancyk. 



Smith Academy's inexperienced 1947 
soccer squad had a fair season, as they 
registered three victories, five losses, and 
two ties. The S.A. schedule included the 
co-champions of Western Massachusetts. 
Both these teams were out of the Smith 
class; and as a result, S.A. took two de- 
feats from Easthampton, also HL champs, 
and one from Ludlow. As told to this re- 
porter by some Ludlow players, S.A. gave 
Ludlow the toughest scrap they had had in 
a long time, before losing out, 4 to 0. 

S.A.'s three wins were over Smith School 
and Holyoke Trade, twice. In spite of a 
disastrous start in the Hampshire League, 
the squad managed to pull up in third place 
by getting two wins and a tie in the last 
half of the league to break out almost even 
in league competition with three wins, four 
setbacks, and a tie. The booters lost to 
Hopkins 1-0 in the first encounter but 
played a scoreless tie with their arch- 
rivals in the other tilt. "Jake" Majesky 



had three shut-outs to his credit. 

S.A. had lost at the beginning of the 
season such players as Bernard Kacenski, 
Bob Pelc, Bill Mullins, Walter Kuchet, and 
Dick Labbee. When the season was half 
over, the booters also lost Archie Proulx, 
center halfback, with the result that the 
defense was weakened a great deal. Never- 
theless, Smith battled against all odds to 
finish the season as a vastly improved team. 
This reporter wishes S.A. loads of luck in 



sports in the years to come! 




Summary: 








Smith Academy 


1 


Springfield Tech 


1 


Smith Academy 





Smith School 


1 


Smith Academy 





Hopkins 


1 


Smith Academy 





Easthampton 


6 


Smith Academy 


5 


Holyoke Trade 


1 


Smith Academy 





Ludlow 


4 


Smith Academy 


2 


Smith School 





Smith Academy 





Hopkins 





Smith Academy 





Easthampton 


4 


Smith Academy 


5 


Holyoke Trade 






PURPLE AND W H I T E ECHO 



Girls' Basketball 




Front Row: Lucy Zawacki. Lucy Szych. Annette Kempisty. Patricia Mullins, Jeanette 
Niewinski, Virginia Yarrows. Mildred Toczko. 

Back Row: Manager Margaret Yachula, Assistant Manager Helen Szewczyk, Ethel 
Omasta, Dorothea Fortsch, Carole Howard. Mary Belden, Assistant Coach Mrs. 
Marjorie Day, Coach Mrs. Florence Muller. 



Because of the difficulties in getting 
transportation, the Smith Academy girls 
were not able to have any additional games 
to their usual schedule. Northampton, Deer- 
field, Hopkins. South Hadley and East- 



hampton, especially, proved the quick move- 
ment and skill of our girls. Mrs. Muller, 
with the aid of Mrs. Day. a newcomer to 
S.A.. again coached the team. 
Summary: 



Jan. 


28 


Smith 


Academy 


48 


South Hadley 


20 


Feb. 


5 


Smith 


Academy 


19 


Northampton 


45 


Feb. 


11 


Smith 


Academy 


21 


Northampton 


41 


Feb. 


14 


Smith 


Academy 


29 


Hopkins 


22 


Feb. 


IS 


Smith 


Academy 


13 


South Deerfield 


18 


March 


5 


Smith 


Academy 


21 


South Deerfield 


24 


March 


12 


Smith 


Academy 


34 


Hopkins 


18 


March 


19 


Smith 


Academy 


34 


Easthampton 


32 










ANNETTE KEMPISTY 


'47 



SMITH ACADEMY 



35 



Literary 



NIUAFO'OU, TIN CAN ISLAND 

On February 3, 1947, I was very surprised 
and overjoyed on receiving' a long-awaited 
letter from a certain Mr. Quensell, Niu- 
afo'ou, Tonga, South Seas. First of all I 
noticed the three brightly colored and 
strange-looking- stamps. But I was dis- 
mayed to find that this cover (envelope in 
your language) did not bear the Tin Can 
Island cachet and for this there is a reason. 
But now I shall tell more about this remote 
island. 

One of the world's most unique mail 
service originated on this island of Niua- 
fo'ou, which lies in a decidedly out-of-the- 
way position in the Pacific Ocean, on the 
north « est edge of the Tongan group. Land- 
ing on this isle is difficult and is often im- 
possible. Letters for the island are placed 
in sealed tins and thrown overboard to be 
picked up by natives in outrigger canoes. 
In very rough weather, when canoes cannot 
possibly be landed, powerful swimmers are 
sent out with the mail. After the exchange 
of mail, the swimmers are faced with from 
two to three hours' work before the Tin 
Can Mail is safely landed. Covers from Tin 
Can Island have a number of cachets in 
several different languages. Formerly, in 
order to get one of these interesting covers, 
one had to send a self-addressed envelope 
with a ten cents coin to Mr. Quensell. The 
reply required six months — and my reply 
had come! 

On turning over the envelope, I immedi- 
ately saw a notice pasted in the center 
saying "Tin Can Mail Service has ended. 
Part of Tin Can Island, Niuafo'ou, has 
blown up by volcanic eruption." Now I knew 
why the cover wasn't cacheted. On opening 
the letter, I read as follows: 

"Walter Geo. Quensell. 
Nukualofa, Tonga, 
South Seas. 

NUKUALOFA, 
TONGA, 
OCEANIA. 
My Dear Friend, 

Your letter of sometime ago came safely 
to hand, for which many thanks. 



As you may have heard Niuafo'ou, or Tin 
Can Island, has been blown up by a very 
great volcanic eruption. Some ten craters 
broke out on or about the 9th and 10th 
September, 1946. 

Great damage has been done which I 
estimate to be somewhere about 50,000 
pounds. All Government buildings have been 
destroyed together with my Tin Can Mail 
Office, therefore the world famous Tin Can 
Service has come to an end. 

As perhaps you know, I started this Tin 
Can Mail Service on 15th October, 1919, 
and which terminated on 9th September, 
1946. 

I lived on the Island for 27 years but 
left just forty days before the eruption, 
which although it wrought great destruc- 
tion, I am happy to say that no lives were 
lost. I certainly consider myself very lucky 
as at the very spot where I had lived 
so long, one of the craters erupted burning 
and burying the whole premises. 
Yours truly, 
Walter George Quensell." 



As I was looking through my old cor- 
respondence the other night, this letter 
from Nukualofa caught my eye. On read- 
ig it over again, I fell to pondering the 
fate of the little island. My version of 
what happened before and after the erup- 
tion of Niuafo'ou goes like this: 

It was a stifling hot and serene afternoon, 
the tenth day of September, on the small 
tropical isle of Niuafo'ou, second largest of 
the Tongan group in the South Seas. The 
natives shifted from one place to another 
in a lazy sort of way, searching for a shady 
spot cooler than the last one. The children 
could be heard screaming and laughing- 
while playing along the hot, white-sanded 
beach. Few of the older children, who were 
very excellent swimmers, were bathing, but 
stayed close to shore. They did not seem to 
be enjoying themselves very much, since 
they had been warned previously that a 
school of man-eating sharks was lurking in 
that vicinity. For this reason, the pearl- 
divers had remained idle for two weeks. 
Instead of warm weather, each day had 



36 



PURPLE AND WHITE ECHO 



become hotter and hotter; and as a result, 
the rice on the terraces withered. At night 
the natives would huddle close together 
when the whole island trembled and a 
rolling, rumbling sound was heard in the 
distance. Niuafo'ou was a volcanic island. 
There were other warning signs. Smoke and 
steam poured forth from recent fissures in 
the rock. A river of lava cut a wide swath 
through the tangled jungle. All these events 
were believed to be signs of evil portent. 
The extremely hot weather must be caused 
by the island's magnetism to Hell; the 
school of sharks was sent by some outer 
force to keep the inhabitants on the island; 
the rice crops failed so that the people 
would starve — so went the rumors. At preci- 
sely midnight on each full moon, a weird, 
blood-chilling dance was performed by the 
high-priests, robed in unique ceremonial 
dress. A dance to Takanaki, God of Salva- 
tion, after which a beautiful young native 
girl was sacrificed on an altar of fire. An 
offering of few to save may, an offering of 
the best to save the rest. 

On that hot afternoon of September 10, 
thoughts, for the moment, were on anything 
but these events. The morning had been 
an unusually quiet one and fainj, breezes 
caressed the glimmering cocoanut palm 
branches. A deathly silence pervaded the 
island that afternoon. Not a leaf stirred, 
the vast open skv was clear of clouds, and 
the sun's rays made the ripples in the 
lagoon sparkle brilliantly. Even the chat- 
tering of the jungle birds and animals was 
intermittent and limited. Later in the day, 
the sharp voices of the children penetrated 
the strange tranquillity of that fatal Sep- 
tember day. But even this noise did not 
seem so loud and piercing as usual; it 
was muffled by some mystifying phenom- 
enon; the ocean tide carried it away and 
brought in a rolling mourning sound. . . . 
Something was going to occur! The stage 
was all set. It could even be sensed linger- 
ing in the air! And then, it came. ... At 
first a low rumbling, interrupted by sharp 
reverberating detonations. These grew loud- 
er and louder! The people were terrified, 
running panic-stricken in all directions. 
Then came a tremendous explosion. Build- 
in°'s shook, walls cracked, and doors flew 



open as if pushed by invisible hands. And 
then another deafening explosion! The 
white-hot lava turned the sea water into 
superheated steam; flying rocks and hot 
ashes covered the entire island, burning and 
burying all. Everything and everybody met 
a hideous fate. An hour later a wall of 
water, advancing on the small lava-covered 
isle at an incredible speed, dashed over the 
island, enveloping it forever in its watery 
tomb. The sun, now blazing like a flaming 
disc, rapidly recedes beyond the horizon. In 
its wake, a tranquil and orange-glowing 
ocean spreads. Where once a colorful island 
interrupted its vast emptiness, flows azure 
waters of centuries. Niuafo'ou lies in eternal 



peace! 



IJEKXAUD S \W I' KJ 'IT 



THE LETTER 

Who could have sent it? What a horri- 
ble letter! An accident — but why had they 
marked him as a victim? If s mind skims 
through tlie names of people he knows. 
Such a horrible revenge for some crime he 
knows nothing about. Could it he from the 
two thugs he had seen breaking into the 
town hall? Or could it he those two 
toughies who had just moved from across 
the street? Suddenly he scrambles to his 
feet as the telephone starts shrilly ringing. 
As he picks up the receiver, he hears a 
perfect impersonation of Humphrey Bogart, 
saying, 

"Lemme talk to Johnnie." 

He trembles, suddenly remembering the 
letter, and succeeds after a few minutes in 
murmuring, like a man ready to meet his 
death. "This is he." 

Comes a moment of silence; then tht 
sinister voice continues. 

"Didja get a letter today?" 

"W-e-11. w-ell — you see." — 

"Ya know what the letter says, doncha?" 
comes the roaring of a stark madman. 
"Well then — " comes another quiet moment 
— "April Fool!" Another moment's silence. 
"Hey, Johnny! Say something! Johnny!" 

Johnny is not answering, for he is 
sprawled on the floor, stunned and overcome 
by relief. 

ANNETTE KEMPISTY '47. 



SMITH ACADEMY 



37 



TEEN-AGE PROBLEMS 



We are constantly reading- and hearing 
discussions on the teen-age problem. The 
older generation seems to think that we 
are too reckless, have no responsibility 
whatsoever, and cannot be depended upon. 
What is the case against the teen-agers ? 
There is, for example, complaint about 
"wild parties". We do not like to have 
chaperones at parties. Why? Because we 
want to feel free; we do not want to have 
anyone watching over us. I don't think the 
parties are "wild". I know I've never been 
to any that I would call "wild". Another 
charge made by our elders is that of reck- 
less driving. It is true that the death of 
teen-agers in automobile accidents has in- 
creased 41% this year over last, and that 
teen-agers are worse drivers than men 
and women over sixty-five years of age. 
What is even worse, some boys have formed 
clubs whose membership requires a record 
of driving so fast that police can't catch 
up to them. This charge of carelessness 
on our part can be removed by driving 
carefully and slowly. Our elders also charge 
that teen-agers show no respect for public 
property. I admit that books and other 
things are somewhat ruined by our hands," 
but weren't the other "younger genera- 
tions" the same, in that respect? 



Now, what can be said in behalf of our 
youth ? In my opinion, the problem is not 
so great in a small community, such as 
Hatfield, but it is more serious in cities. 
I think we do more good than . bad. For 
instance, consider the work we did during 
the war, working part-time in factories, 
working on the farms to produce crops. 
Many boys of seventeen and over enlisted 
in the armed forces. As for saying we 
are irresponsible, that isn't true. We all 
have responsibilities. For instance, we are 
responsible for preparing for our future, and 
our future is just a blank. Our whole 
country, we are told, is on the verge of a 
depression, which leaders are now trying 
to avert. When we graduate from high 
school, where will we turn? We realize that 
our future will depend upon the wisdom of 
good planning, and we are trying to prepare 
for that future. In my opinion, the source 
of the problem, if looked into, might be 
found in the home. Sometimes the parents 
are just as bad as the wayward children, 
called juvenile delinquents, and sometimes 
parents are worse. The teen-age problem 
is not caused by youth alone, and it cannot 
be solved by youth alone. 

MARGARET VACHULA '47 



MY PASTURE 

The light green meadow 
Surrounded by a wall, 
Is covered with soft grass 
That, in the morning, sparkles with dew. 
Birds chirping, flit everywhere, 
The cows gently moo, 
As the children slowly trudge 
Along to school. 
This is my pasture 
So large and free, 
Where, every, morning, 
I hear the light, brown chicadee. 
And, as to school I run along 
I am happily singing this little song: 
"Good-bye, dear meadow! 
But not for long, 
Until the close of day 
I shall live under your beauty's sway." 
JOHN FORTSCH '47 



EVE'S FONDNESS FOR APPLES 

Ever since the world was made, it was a 

part of God's plan, 
That man should not be lonely, that there 

should be Maid and Man. 
So E've was made to comfort him and be a 

help mate too; 
But she over-stepped the boundary when 

she wanted apple stew. 
Most women since have followed in the 

steps of Mother Eve; 
And it indeed should make us sad, 

Should make us grieve. 
But if Adam and Eve were here today, 
I think they would almost die 

Of joy over the sight and taste of 
A delicious apple pie! 

BERNARD SAWICKI '47 



38 



PURPLE AND WHITE ECHO 



FROM THE HILL TOP 

Calm and peaceful 

I gaze at the world around. 

Rivers flowing rapidly. 

Sun brightly glaring, 

Grass cool and green, 

Flowers in gorgeous bloom. 

Lacy green leaves 

Gleaming in the sun, 

Children calling one another 

In shouts and happy laughter. 

From the hill top, 

Calm, I gaze at the world around. 

LUCY SZYCH '47 



THE HIGH COST OF LIVING 

The cost of living is very high 

Everyone does complain, 

Articles cost twice their worth. 

"When will they come down!" we exclaim. 

Food, Shelter, Luxury and Dress 
To highest prices have soared. 
Trying' to balance a budget is a mess. 
With these conditions everyone is bored. 

DANIEL J. FUSEK '47 



BOOKKEEPING 

A hard subject is Bookkeeping, 

With Mrs. O'Neill constantly repeating: 

"Debit what conies in, credit what goes out." 

By that time I don't know what she's talking about. 

We six students are so often yearnin', 
As we try to get some business learnin'. 
Instead of notes and checks of every description, 
We six stuc.ents often yearn to read f ction. 

I am called to the desk where my work is checked, 
My aniwer is right, but the amount is incorrect, 
Asked if I copied. I answer — "Oh, no!" 
The teacher says — "My, but you're clever." 
And I answer, "Of course — I'm no dodo!" 

We are told to turn to page 218, 

But I am engrossed in a Junior's "Seventeen." 

I look up with a sigh when asked what I'm leading. 

I repeat — a hard subject is Bookkeeping! 

IRENE KRAULIS '47 



SMITH ACADEMY 39 

A BALLAD OF THE ONION SEASON 

Spring is coming on this way 

On onions you'll be working, day after day. 

The thought of woiking gives you a pain, 

The one who started this must have been insane. 

On your knees you get, on a cold, damp day, 
Setting onions, acre after acre, in the same old way. 
Before you know it, a day's work is done, 
And your back, does it hurt — Son of a Gun! 

Patiently waiting for the onions to grow, 

You wonder if this year you'll make any dough. 

By now the green tops are coming up on the ; r own, 

The thought of weeding them makes you feel like running away. 

Time has come the weeds are high. 

In the burning hot sun you almost die. 

You look around, waiting for the five o'clock whistle to blow 

Before you know it, you're getting poked for sitting on your row. 

The green tops have grown a few feet high. 
Standing with a hoe you look up at the sky, 
Watching the planes roar swiftly by. 
AH you say is, "That lucky guy!" 

Boy, oh Boy! The weeding is done! 

But oh! There's clipping, and that's no fun. 

"Will this darn work ever end?" 

Is what you keep muttering to your friend. 

Seven in the morning, up you get, 
Time to clip, did you forget? 
Getting ready, you're as slow as can be, 
You're in no hurry, it's plain to see. 

Finally you're settled and begin to clip. 

You say, "When we're through, I'm taking a trip." 

With that big straw hat on your head, 

You look like a native, not alive, but almost dead. 

The clipping is done and are you glad! 

Now it's screening — but that isn't bad, 

All you do is help shake the screen, 

And often skip to the store for some ice cream. 

What a relief — the summer's work is done. 
Sitting and loafing, that'll be fun. 
Planning your trip you sit and drool, 
Oh! Darn it! Next week is school! 

HELEN MICHALOWSKI '47 



40 



PURPLE AND WHITE ECHO 



Thespians 




Front Row: Lucy Szych, Joanne Howard, Annette Kempisty, Margaret Vachula, 
Bernard Sawicki, Bernice Buckowski, Stacia Kostek, Helen Szewszyk. 

Back Row: Irene Kraulis, John Fortsch, Charles Labbee, Alex Widelo, Robert Breor, 
Leonard Karpinski, Janet Zuchowski, Helen Michalowski, Miss Ryan. 

THESPIAN OFFICERS 

President — Bernard Sawicki Vice President — Margaret Vachula 

Secretary-Treasurer — Bernice Buckowski 



EYE-WITNESS REPORT OF 
SENIOR PLAY 

On the night of November 15, 1946, a 
large audience of parents and friends ex- 
perienced thrills and laughs when the S.A. 
Thespians presented their first melodrama, 
entitled "Dangerous Ladies", on the Me- 
morial town hall stage. The actors were all 
well-cast, and each gave a creditable per- 
formance in the three-act mystery melo- 
drama which held many moments of sus- 
pense, with comedy bits to relieve the 
tension. 

Bernice Buckowski, first time on stage, 
and Margaret Vachula, veteran of "Pickles," 
shared honors as the "dangerous ladies." 



Bernice, as Charlotte Harris, played with 
po'se and precision the difficult role of the 
cultured spinster who is in a plot to obtain 
secret information from aircraft workers. 
"Peep" Vachula, as her sister Laura, por- 
trayed with skill the sweet, innocent lover 
of flowers who eagerly and unquestioningrly 
followed the determined and strict orders 
of her domineering older sister. 

Robert Breor portrayed a young country 
boy, Johnny Porter, who grows up fast 
when he discovers himself the victim of a 
cleverly-laid plot. The first dramatic note 
in the play is sounded by his murder in cold 
blood by the two villains, Leonard Karpin- 
ski and Alex Widelo. Alex, as Andrews, the 



SMITH ACADEMY 



41 



butler, underscored the villainy of his deeds 
by the suave, cool, correct manner in which 
he performed them. Leonard, as Michael, 
the gardener, made striking the contrast 
between his devotion to flowers and his 
eager willingness to obey the most heartless 
commands. 

Annette Kempisty, as Ellen Burgess, 
niece of the Harris sisters, gave a skillful 
and pleasant performance, revealing the 
charm of the young girl, and meeting the 
requirements of dramatic action very ably. 
Bernard Sawicki, as Bob Ransome, the test 
pilot, whose interest in Ellen brought him 
to the Harris home, met the varied require- 
ments of the role with mastery, playing 
equally well the light romantic moments 
and the tense dramatic scenes. Both Annette 
and Bernie are veteran stars of "Almost 
Eighteen" and "Pickles Becomes a Lady." 

In the role of Sheba, Ellen's colored maid, 
Lucy Szych won many laughs and also 
provided several moments of suspense with 
her zestful interpretations. Stacia Kostek 
played effectively the part of Hilda, the 
cook, portraying well the remorseful horror 
of an unwilling observer of crime. As guard- 
ians of the law, Charles Labbee and Joanne 
Howard both gave finished performances. 
Charles gave a clever portrayal of Kelly, 
the cop, at first genial and unsuspecting, 
but eventually alert and efficient; while 
Joanne's performance as Monica Hart, FBI 
agent, was an excellent blend of casualness 



and efficiency. All the players showed good 
dramatic talent, and the performance was 
well-applauded. 

Between the acts the Academy choristers, 
directed by Miss Maude E. Boyle, sang 
several songs, which included "Night and 
Day" and "In the Still of the Night," dis- 
playing a great musical talent. After Act II 
there were selections by "The Seven Aces," 
an orchestra composed of John Fortsch, 
Teddy Besko, Charles Labbee, Carl Majesky, 
John Toczko, Edward Betsold, and Mildred 
Toczko. 

"Dangerous Ladies" was coached by Miss 
Mary E. Ryan of the faculty. Miss Ryan 
has coached all previous plays and deserves 
very much credit for her untiring devotions 
in making the plays successful. The stage 
crew consisted of Myron Sikorski, Leonard 
Karpinski, and Alex Widelo. Helen Szew- 
czyk was promoter; stage properties were 
in charge of Mrs. Robert Day of the fac- 
ulty. John Fortsch was technician. The 
ticket sale was directed by Principal John 
C. Jakobek, and programs were printed 
under direction of Mrs. Margaret Pruzyn- 
ski. Junior ushers were under direction of 
Mrs. B. C. O'Neill. Both Mrs. Pruzynski 
and Mrs. O'Neill are S.A. faculty members. 

At the close of the second act, Bernard 
Sawicki, president of the Thespians, pre- 
sented a lapel pin and matching ear-rings 
to the director, Miss Ryan. 




42 



PURPLE AND WHITE ECHO 



Pro Merito 




Front Row: Esther Carter, Dorothy Skarzinski, Evelyn Kacinski, Jennie Maiewski, 

Stacia Kostek. 
Back Row: Mrs. Pruzynski, Stanley Kirejczyk, Bernard Sawicki, Miss Ryan. 



JUNIOR OFFICERS 
Dorothy Skarzyinski . . . President 
Esther Carter .... Vice -President 
Evelyn Kacinski Secretary 

SENIOR OFFICERS 

Jennie Maiewski President 

Bernard Sawicki . . . Vice President 

Stacia Kostek Secretary 

Stanley Kirejczyk ... . Treasurer 

Seven Smith Academy Pro Merito stu- 
dents, accompanied by Principal Jakobek 
and Miss Ryan, adviser, went to Gardner 
High School on May 10 to attend the annual 
spring state convention of Pro Merito 
groups. The session opened with registra- 
tion at ten, followed by a trampoline exhi- 
bition in the gym at ten-thirty under the 
direction of the head coach at Gardner. 
Before the business meetings conducted 
from eleven until noon, Principal Williams 
of Gardner welcomed the delegates. Lunch- 
eon in the high school cafeteria was fol- 



lowed by a social period with dancing. At 
two o'clock the different chapters assembled 
to hear greetings from Mr. Frank C. Chase, 
superintendent of the Gardner schools. 
After this address, poems were read by 
delegates from eight of the attending chap- 
ters, and the best reader, chosen by ap- 
plause was a South Hadley delegate who 
read "If", by Rudyard Kipling. A few nrn- 
utes later, the assembled group listened to 
a very interesting address, entitled "Three- 
Sided You", by Professor Robert S. Illing- 
worth of Clark University, Worcester. The 
speaker urged us to remember that each of 
us needs to foster not only physical health, 
but mental and spiritual health as well. The 
program closed with a play, "Grandma Pulls 
the String", which was presented by the 
Masquers, under the direction of Mr. Joseph 
Kivlin. For an appropriate closing of the 
annual convention, the Pro Merito members 
sang the Pro Merito Song. 

JENNIE MAIEWSKI 



SMITH ACADEMY 



43 



Prize Speakers 




Front Row : Irene Kraulis, Annette Kempisty, Bernice Buckowski, Margaret Vachula, 

Stacia Kostek. 
Back Row: John Fortsch, Stanley Kirejczyk, Miss Ryan, Bernard Sawicki, Alex Widelo. 



ALUMNI PRIZE SPEAKING CONTEST 

SMITH ACADEMY May 16, 1946 

PROGRAM 

*1. What Is America Barksdale 

John Fortsch 

2. Joe Goes Home Palmer 

Stacia Kostek 

3. Americanism Roosevelt 

Alex Widelo 

4. The Night the Bed Fell Thurber 

Margaret Vachula 

**5. Boyhood of Ike Eisenhower Davis 

Stanley Kirejczyk 

Water-Lillies Linders 

Girls' Glee Club 

**6. Yellow Butterflies Andrews 

Annette Kempisty 

7. The Murderer's Confession Poe 

Bernard Sawicki 

8. Kindly Light Sizoo 

Irene Kraulis 



9. Putting the Atom to Work Davis 

Daniel Fusek 
*10. Mrs. McWilliams and the Lightning 

Twain 
Bernice Buchowski 
*First Prize **Second Prize 

Selections from "H.M.S. Pinafore" 

We Sail the Ocean Blue— Boys' Glee Club 
The Monarch of the Sea — Arthur Proulx 

and Chorus 
I'm Called Little Buttercup — 

Barbara Ryan and Girls' Glee Club 
I Am the Captain of the Pinafore — 

Richard Labbee and Chorus 
Accompanists: 

Joan Bangs and Patricia Mullins 
Conference of Judges 

Lorimer H. Brown Easthampton 

Mrs. Fannie Allen Hopkins 

Mrs. James P. Reed Hopkins 

Award of Prizes Smith Academy Song 



44 



PURPLE AND WHITE ECHO 



Washington Trip 



WASHINGTON DAY BY DAY 

Monday, April 21 

A very happy and excited group of four 
girls and four boys, which included Annette 
Kempisty, Stacia Kostek, Gertrude Petri- 
koski, Joanne Howard, John Fortsch, Leon- 
ard Karpinski, Stanley Kirejczyk, and Bern- 
ard Sawicki, awaited the arrival of the 7:20 
A.M. train at the Northampton Railroad 
Station. That long-awaited day had finally 
come — we were off for Washington! And 
what a send off — a cold, biting sleet storm! 
This is where our winter overcoats came 
out of the mothballs and into good use 
again. 

On the train we joined three students 
from Arms Academy, one girl from Deer- 
field High School, and eighteen students 
from good ol' Hopkins Academy. On the 
way down we quickly became acquainted 
with one another and sang the time away. 
Before noon we arrived at Grand Central 
Terminal and walked to a bus station in a 
downpour of cold rain. After tidying up a 
bit there, we took a bus to the pier of the 
Jersey City ferry. Many of us were sur- 
prised to find ourselves on the ferry and 
crossing the Hudson River to Jersey City, 
New Jersey, while still inside the riding 
coach. Even though the day was cloudy and 
wet. a view of the Statue of Liberty, Ellis 
and Governor's Island, the harbor traffic, 
and the New York City sky line was avail- 
able. Once landing in Jersey City, we 
boarded a comfortable Baltimore and Ohio 
pullman which went straight through to 
Washington. After getting settled, luncheon 
in the diner was announced. The meal was 
very tempting, and consisted of chicken, 
mashed potatoes and gravy, string beans, 
and a pie a la mode for dessert. The rest 
of the way was spent singing and joking, 
which quickly passed away the time. 

At about 6:00 P.M. we arrived at Union 
Station in Washington. Everyone was 
amazed at the vastness and beauty of the 
station. We were told that President Tru- 
man was to arrive from New York soon. 
All the people were crowded around the 
gates, pushing one another to get a better 
view. The most any of us saw of the Presi- 
dent was part of his hat and coat. He was 
guarded very closely and stepped inside a 



large, shining black car which went right 
through the station, along with five or six 
cars like his. 

A waiting motor coach transferred us to 
the unforgetable Burlington Hotel where we 
were told with whom we were to room, 
and then given keys. There were two to six 
persons in each room or rooms. Suite 425 
consisted of three large rooms and a bath- 
room. The two Arms Academy boys and the 
four S. A. boys settled there for the next 
five days. After freshening up some, every- 
one met in the lobby and went into a spaci- 
ous dining room. The waiters were colored 
and very kind. We were served chicken (but 
Southern-fried) again. At the table every- 
one decided to go to a show that night. 
We took taxi cabs from the hotel to the 
Capitol theatre, where we saw a movie 
"Carnival in Costa Rica" and a stage show. 
It was here that the immortal expression 
"Hiya Roy" originated, 'member kids? 
We got out at midnight and immediately 
took cabs back to the hotel. It seems that 
Suite 425 was somewhat disturbing to the 
neighboring rooms, and received several 
calls from the manager, and our chaperone, 
Mr. Battey, at about 3:00 A.M. The boys 
claimed that some other room must have 
been making the racket — and that shatter- 
ing scream certainly came from elsewhere. 
Thus began Mr. Battey's worries, also a 
new day. . . . 

Tuesday, April 22 

On 7:00 A.M. sharp we were aroused 
from deep slumber by the ringing of the 
phone. It was the hotel operator telling us 
that it was time to get up. We had a brief 
breakfast at 8 and left at 8:30. The day 
was beautiful, the sun made the leaves and 
grass glow a brilliant green after the rain 
storm during the night, and the weather 
was warm. We boarded a waiting motor 
coach which brought us to the Bureau of 
Engraving and Printing where we saw the 
printing of United States money and post- 
age stamps. Thence we were brought to the 
Pan American Union building, the official 
home of the South American Republics, and 
one of Washington's most beautiful build- 
ings. On entering, we saw before us an 
open air tropical garden composed of hun- 
dreds of different plants and several multi- 



SMITH ACADEMY 



45 



colored parrots. In the center of the patio, 
or courtyard, a flowing Aztec fountain 
arose. After taking pictures of that, we 
were shown the other parts of the large 
building. This included the Hall of the 
Americas, Governing Board Room, and the 
Gallery of Flags and Heroes. Our next 
stop was the towering Washington Monu- 
ment, where the entire city and surrounding 
country can be seen from the top, which is 
five hundred and fifty-five feet high! All of 
us went up by the elevator, which is almost 
a two-minute ride up, but walked down the 
nine hundred stairs. Never again! Here 
the cameras were in full action, and necks 
stretched. From there the bus brought us 
to the magnificent White House, the official 
home of the President. Everyone was great- 
ly impressed by the splendor and beauty of 
the different colored rooms and dazzling 
chandeliers. Some of us ran around the 
gates to take pictures of the front of the 
building; we got the pictures, along side 
a scolding from Mr. Battey for holding up 
the "works." After that we had luncheon 
at the hotel — oh, brother, did we need it! 
After resting ourselves and reloading the 
cameras for a busy afternoon, we boarded 
our reserved bus, and now chaperoned by 
Mrs. Battey. Our driver was called "Garden- 
ia" and was very comical; the acting guide 
for that afternoon, Gay Concoleman, pulled 
a couple of "fast ones" on us. He pointed 
out the embassies, foreign legations, and 
other famous homes and public buildings. 
On arriving at the Arlington National Cem- 
etery in Arlington, Virginia, we visited the 
Curtis Lee Mansion, the Greek-like Memor- 
ial Amphitheater, where services are held 
only three times a year, and the mast of 
the battleship Maine was pointed out. We 
also visited the Tomb of the Unknown Sol- 
dier here and saw how the guard is changed 
before the tomb. Continuing on through 
historic Alexandria, Virginia, we visited Mt. 
Vernon, where we saw the tombs of George 
and Martha Washington, and the gardens 
and ancestral homes of our first President. 
On the return from Mt. Vernon, many his- 
toric places in Alexandria were pointed out, 
such as Christ Church where George Wash- 
ington's and Robert E. Lee's pews may be 
seen, the Carlyle House, the home of John 



L. Lewis, a Hessian-constructed cobblestone 
road, and many, many others. In Washing- 
ton once again, we traveled around the 
Tidal Basin where the blooming double- 
Japanese cherry tree blossoms were seen, 
and also the reflection of the Washington 
Monument in the Potomac. 

On returning to the hotel for a steak 
dinner with all the trimmings, we were told 
to be ready that evening for a visit to the 
Congressional Library. Here we saw the 
original Declaration of Independence, the 
original Constitution of the United States, 
and numerous other historical articles. We 
were deeply impressed by the outstanding 
architecture and unique mosaics. Outside, 
across from the Library, the beautifully il- 
luminated Capitol and brightly colored 
fountains could be seen. From here we 
went to the immense National Airport (not 
included in our schedule) where three planes 
land every minute. This is where the Presi- 
dent's private "Sacred Cow" is kept. We 
were all quite exhausted by then, and slept 
heavily that night. 

Wednesday, April 23 

This pleasant and warm morning was 
spent at the Smithsonian and New Na- 
tional Museums, where we saw Lindbergh's 
Spirit of St. Louis suspended in the air 
from the ceiling, the first railroad locomo- 
tive, the first telephone, all inaugural gowns 
of Presidents' wives, Theodore Roosevelt's 
collection of African animals, the flag which 
inspired Francis Scott Key to write our Na- 
tional Anthem, and other items equally in- 
teresting. Later on we walked from the In- 
situte to the Mellon Gallery of Art, where 
the world's most famous paintings are 
found. 

After another delicious luncheon at the 
Burlington, we prepared for a long, but 
merry, drive to the United States Naval 
Academy at Annapolis, Maryland. "Garden- 
ia" was driver and Gay, guide, and Mr. 
Battey, chaperone. Here we visited the tomb 
of John Paul Jones, which is surrounded by 
a solid gold rope, and then Bancroft Hall. 
On the parade grounds we witnessed an ex- 
hibition drill by 3800 Naval Cadets in full 
dress. Everyone was amazed at the preci- 
sion with which they marched. This is where 



46 



PURPLE AND WHITE ECHO 



the camera really got a workout. Huh girls ? 

That evening almost everyone went to 
Keith's to see "The Best Years of Our 
Lives," winner of nine academy awards for 
the year 1946. After the show several of 
the students began writing a book entitled 
"Washington Trip — Best Week of Our 
Lives." 

Thursday, April 24 

After a rather late breakfast, we began 
another interesting day. Like the previous 
days, the weather was fine, but just a little 
too hot (80 in the shade). Our waiting bus 
brought us to the Franciscan Monastery at 
Mount St. Sepulcre, where we visited re- 
plicas of tombs of the Holy Land, the Pur- 
gatory Chapel, the winding catacombs, and 
attended a short mass. The gardens were 
beautifully plotted. After the service we 
again boarded our bus, which took us to the 
Zoological Gardens, where we saw the most 
complete and world-famous collection of 
animals. The snake house was the center of 
attraction for our group. 

Following another delicious luncheon at 
the hotel (hmmm — those fluffy, Southern- 
made biscuits!), we toured the new Supreme 
Court building, one of imposing beauty be- 
fitting the home of the highest judicial 
tribunal of the land. From here we walked 
to the Folger Shakespeare Library, where 
we saw the most complete collection of 
material relating to Shakespeare and his 
writing's. The Capitol was the next stop. 
A guide took us for a complete tour of the 
spacious building. It is 751 feet long and 350 
feet wide and contains 431 rooms. The 
paitings on the walls and dome were thoro- 
ughly explained. Many interesting spots 
were pointed out, such as the one where 
John Quincy Adams died, the old Senate, 
the present House and Senate, and the 
former Supreme Court room. We observed 
the Senate while in session, discussing the 
Greece-Turkey loan bill. The Capitol is 
classed as one of the most beautiful build- 
ings in the world and the grounds are artis- 
tically landscaped. There are trees and 
shrubs from every land on the grounds. The 
rest of the afternoon we were free to roam 
where we wished. Some of the boys went 
swimming at the Ambassador Hotel, most 
of the girls went shopping (so they said), 



and others went "re-sight-seeing" the fa- 
mous places, as the Washington Monument, 
Lincoln Memorial, Art Gallery, White House, 
the Capitol, and many others. 

That evening, part of the group went by 
trolley to an amusement park in Maryland, 
called Glen Echo, and others by taxi cabs. 
That last night in Washington was not 
spent sleeping. Everyone was visiting every- 
body everywhere (wheww). I wonder if the 
walls of Suite 425 are dried yet? Fortschy 
was singing "How Dry I Am" and got all 
the water he ever wants. 

Friday, April 25 

Friday morning most of us found it hard 
getting up. but we got off before nine 
o'clock for the B. & 0. train for New York 
City. Departing from "unforgetable Bur- 
lington" was hard for all. Arriving at Union 
Station we bade Gay farewell and told him 
to give our regards to Gardenia. We boarded 
a long pullman and left at 9:20. The ride 
was not so joyful as the one coming up, 
since almost everyone was "dog-tired." Out- 
side it was gloomy and drizzly. At 11:30 
luncheon on the diner was announced. It 
was very delicious (heard that word some- 
where before?) and riding was smooth. 
Being livened up by this meal, the sound of 
singing and laughing voices were heard all 
the way to Jersey City. On our arrival 
there, we again boarded buses and were 
transported across the Hudson, and then 
brought to the Victoria Hotel in New York 
City. Times Square was a block or so down. 

The rest of the afternoon we attended a 
performance at Radio City Music Hall 
Theatre, which is the largest theatre in 
the world. There we saw the famous Music 
Hall Rockettes, the Corps de Ballet, and 
several other stage performances, with 
music by the Music Hall Symphony Or- 
chestra. The movie was entitled "The Egg 
And I," starring Claudette Colbert and Fred 
Mac-Murray. After the show we immediately 
went to the hotel and dined in the exotic 
"Candlelight Room." 

That evening we were provided a guided 
tour of Rockefeller Center which included a 
visit to the Observation Roof, which is 
seventy-seven stories high. An entire view 
of the city was available and many points 



SMITH ACADEMY 



47 



of interest were seen from above. It was 
almost midnight when we arrived at the 
hotel. Many spent the rest of the night and 
early morning meeting other outside-sehool 
students. The poor house detective and man- 
ager really earned their day's pay that 
night. Escorting guests to their rooms at 
three and four o'clock in the morning is 
no fun, and especially that one from Room 
401 to 408. 

Saturday, April 26 
After quite a bit of difficulty, we arose at 
the ringing of the phone. It was just the 
operator telling us it was time to get up. 
The sun was shining brightly, but still it 
was very chilly. After getting accustomed 
to the warm weather of D. C, we were 
simply freezing here. We took subways 
from Times Square to Battery Park, where 
we awaited the arrival of the ferry from 
the Statue of Liberty. Darn our luck — we 
just missed the boat by a minute and had 
to wait for another forty-five minutes, 
chattering the time away. At 10:45, we 
finally boarded the ferry which brought us 
to our destination in ten minutes. Many 
walked the entire way up to the crown, 
others took an elevator to the pedestal and 



walked the 168 narrow and steep stairs 
of the statue itself. This seemed nothing to 
us after walking the 900 steps of the 
Washington Monument in D. C. Many 
souvenirs were purchased here and names 
written in the visitors' register. 

We were allowed to go anywhere for the 
remainder of the day. Almost everyone went 
shopping in the over-crowded stores. At 
four P.M. we all met at the hotel for our 
final departure. We took taxi cabs to Grand 
Central Terminal and boarded our reserved 
section of a car. At 5:30 the train left the 
station and arrived in familiar Northamp- 
ton before nine. Very tired, but still very 
happy, we left for Home with an over- 
packed head — suitcase too — of pleasant me- 
mories. 

Aftermath 
Sunday, April 27 

Slept all day. 

April 28-June 18 

Resumed journey of knowledge with me- 
mories of the Washington trip, ever bright. 

BERNARD SAWICKI, 
S.A. '47 Salutatorian. 



Washington Trip Snaps 




Informal Snaps 




Identification on Page 52 



50 



PURPLE AND WHITE ECHO 



School Autographs 




Wttk. if o*. all CAc^ 
2 w fatfr 




u fy 4ui> y^i\ 







ii 







y **t<e*. 



^^-^ 



SMITH ACAD EM Y 



51 



Autographs 



52 



PURPLE AND WHITE ECHO 



Appreciation 



This space is reserved by the Class of 1947 of Smith 

Academy to thank the many advertisers who have so 

generously contributed to the support of this year book. 

Please patronize them. 



1 Janet Zuchowski 

2 Annette Kempisty 
9 Joanne Howard 

4 Staeia Kostek 

5 Lucille Szych 

6 Annette Kempisty 
Bernard Sawicki 
Joanne Howard 



INFORMAL SNAPS IDENTIFICATION 



7 Bernice Buckowski 

8 Janet Zuchowski 

9 Miss Ryan 

10 Bernard Sawicki 

11 Helen Michalowski 

12 Irene Kraulis 

13 John Fortsch 

14 Bernard Sawicki 



15 Margaret Vachula 
Bernice Buckowski 
Stanley Kierjczyk 

16 Stanley Kierjczyk 

17 Lucille Szych 
Staeia Kostek 
Joanne Howard 
Annette Kempisty 



18 Annette Kempisty 

19 Margaret Vachula 

20 Irene Kraulis 

21 Jennie Maiewski 

22 Pep, Bernie, Benny 



DONNIS LUMBER CO. 

Hatfield 


Compliments of 
B. & B. RESTAURANT 

Manager Paul Stefancik 
Prospect St. Hatfield 


ATHLETIC SUPPLIES 

T. A. PURSEGLOVE CO. 

15 State St. 
Northampton 


Compliments of 

HATFIELD GARAGE 


THE BEE HIVE STORE 

SHOES and FURNISHINGS 
29 Main St. Northampton 


y 
T 

E 

R 

R 

Y 

> 
S 


Compliments of 

E. S. DICKINSON 



Business Managers 

SAWICKI 

KEMPISTY 
KARPINSKI 


Compliments of 
DAVID BOOT SHOP 

Northampton 


Phone 967 

FENTON CLEANERS 

Fifth Ave. Cleaning at 

THRIFT AVE. PRICES 

171 Main St., Northampton 

WE CALL FOR AND DELIVER 


Compliments of 

BERNIE 

ANNETTE 

LENNIE 


HOWARD JOHNSON'S 

West Hatfield 
Tel. 48G1 


Phone 2590-W 

EDWARD H. ZUJEWSKI 

ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR 

30 Main Street 
Northampton, Massachusetts 


Compliments of 

WADE'S 

Steakburgers — Hot Dogs 
Ice Cream 
WEST HATFIELD 


Compliments of 
HAMPSHIRE FURNITURE CO. 

3 Main St. Northampton 


YEARBOOK STAFF 



Phone 3042 


Compliments of 


DAILEY'S 


WILLIAM DWYER 


DOUBLE DIAMOND 


FLORIST 


FEEDS 






192 Main Street 


Michael S. Raffa 


Northampton 


36 Elm St. Hatfield 


Tel. 3714 


Compliments of 




PELC'S CAFE 


Best Wishes and Good Luck 


Choice Liquors and Wines 


THE 


DANCING 


COZY CORNER CLUB 


Phone 2721 


Annette, Bernie, Joanne, Lenny 


Hatfield 





To the Class of 1947 

CONGRATULATIONS 

and 
BEST WISHES 



TERRY'S 
SWEET 
S H PP E 



Compliments of 
HATFIELL CLUB 


LOLA 

& 
B E R N I E 


BOBS SODA 
SHOPPE 


The Cast 

of 

"DANGEROUS LADIES" 


CARLSON'S 

Men's and Boys' Wear 

"Where the Boys and Men 

Like to Shop" 

Corner of Main and Pleasant 
Northampton 


A REAL GOOD PLACE TO EAT 
BECKMANN'S 

Northampton 


Compliments of 

A FRIEND 

Hadley 



Compliments of 



THE IMPERIAL AGRICULTURAL CORP. 



of Massachusetts 



HELEN'S BEAUTY SALON 

Specializing in All Branches of 
BEAUTY CULTURE 



HELEN GIZIENSKI 
Phone 733-M 



245 Main St. 
Northampton, Mass. 



Compliments of 


Compliments of 


MODERNE BEAUTY SALON 


NORTHAMPTON 


42 Pleasant St. 


FROZEN FOOD 


Northampton 


LOCKER CO. 


Compliments of 




WALTER KUCHYT, 


MacDONALD'S 


Manager 


SHOE SHOP 


FIRST NATIONAL STORES 


185 Main St. Northampton 


55 Main St. Hatfield 





We extend to the Class of 1947 of Smith Academy 

OUR CONGRATULATIONS AND BEST WISHES 

FOR A SUCCESSFUL FUTURE 

* • 

HOWARD & WOODWARD 

INSURANCE 

14 ELM STREET HATFIELD, MASS. 


MERRITT CLARK & CO. 

Sport Clothes 

Priced right for the young- 
man who graduates 

NORTHAMPTON 


NATIONAL SHOE REPAIRING 
JOE and BILL 

Under New Management 

FINEST WORKMANSHIP 

Best Quality of Materials Used 

Our Prices Are Always the Lowest 

Masonic St. Northampton 


CLIFFORD'S 
CANDY — SODA 

Hood's Old Fashioned 

ICE CREAM 
Next to Calvin Theater 


LOCKSMITH 

KEYS OF ALL KINDS 
LUGGAGE REPAIRING 

HARLOW'S 

18 Center St. Northampton 


Congratulations and Lots 
of Luck 

To The Class of '47 

JACK AUGUST 

Northampton 

"Eat Fish and Keep Fit" 


Bulova Elgin Hamilton 

Ornega Movado Longin 

Wittnauer Watches 

WOOD AND STRAND 
Jewelers 

Northampton 



Compliments of 

PETE'S MARKET 

Peter Lizak, Prop. 
Raymond Avenue 



Hatfield 



Compliments of 
BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

HATFIELD 



Compliments of 




DR. 0. T. DEWHURST 


A. E. CELATKA 


Optometrist 


ASGROW SEEDS 


Tel. 184-W 201 Main St. 


Hatfield 


Northampton 




FLYNN'S DRUG STORE 




JAMES P. FLYNN 




Prescription Specialists 


RUBY'S FURNITURE STORES 




Telephone 3519 


LOUIS P. RUDER 
Registered Pharmacist' 


15 Bridge St. Northampton 


24 Main St. Northampton 





Compliments of 

S. ANTHONY, Manager 

PURITAN CLOTHING STORE 

Phone 1250 
27 Main Street Northampton 



STOP AT 
THE MIDWAY 

For Tasty Hotdogs 
348 V 2 King Street Northampton 

Phone Northampton 308 
MARTIN A. PADDOCK 

FIXE TAILORING 

4 Crafts Ave. — Next to City Hall 
Northampton 



KOCHAN'S PACKAGE STORE 

FOR FINEST 

BEER AND WINE 

Phone 4271 



VENETIAN BLINDS 

AWNINGS 

Furniture Upholstery 

Window Shades 

Automobile Tops 
Glass and Body Work 

CHILSONS SHOPS 

Tel. 1822 
34 Center St. Northampton 



SENIOR 

PRO MERITO 

CHAPTER 



J. W. PARSONS & SON 

Farm Machinery and Tractors 
Farm Supplies 

Phone 2885 P.O. Box 152 
75 North King Street 


Compliments of 

FITZGERALD'S 
BARBER SHOP 

Northampton 
C. PAPAGEORGE, Prop. 


Compliments of 

THE FAIR STORE 

27 Pleasant Street 
Northampton 


Compliments of 
UNITED DAIRY, INC. 

NORTHAMPTON 


1896 — 1947 

NORTHAMPTON COMMERCIAL COLLEGE 

"The School of Thoroughness' 

For more than a century we have prepared young people for success- 
ful careers. We pledge a continuance of our thorough training, 
individual interest, and aid in finding just the right position. 


Compliments of 

DAILY HAMPSHIRE 
GAZETTE 

Northampton 


Compliments of 

BRADSTREET CAFE 

Mr. S. Pacenski, Prop. 

ALL LIQUORS 
Bradstreet Tel. 2331 



L. G. BALFOUR COMPANY 

Attleboro Massachusetts 

Class Rings and Pins 

Commencement Announcements 

Diplomas — Personal Cards 

Medals — Trophies 

Club Insignia 
Represented by GRON LLOYD 



W. E. LONDE R G A N 

PRINTING 

Tel. 1740 NORTHAMPTON 100 King St. 



C. F. ROBERTS 

Native Poultry And Eggs 
Telephone 2591 Chestnut St. 



Compliments of 


MEYER AND MENDELSOHN 


Compliments of i 


N U S H I A 


Compliments of 




SMITH BROS. 
Radio and Appliance 


Compliments of 


Service 


A FRIEND 


7 Maple Street 




Hatfield 






Compliments to the 


Compliments of 


CLASS OF '47 


COHEN BROS. 


VANASSE AND YOUNG 


Northampton 


11 Pleasant St. 
Northampton 




Nap Mercier 



Compliments of 

TWIN 

CLEANING & COLD FUR STORAGE 

Phone 1911 
211 North St. Northampton 


FIRESTONE 
Home and Auto Supplies 

21 Pleasant St. Phone 2429 
NORTHAMPTON 


Compliments of 

EDWARD L. SHEEHAN 

24 Pleasant Street 
NORTHAMPTON 


MORIARTY BROTHERS 
FURNITURE 

NORTHAMPTON 


Compliments of 

RAYMOND A. LABBEE 

"THE PINES" 

Modern Cabins Fountain Service 
Socony Service Station 
Tel. Northampton 292 


Eat and Enjoy 

MANHAN'S 

Potato Chips Cheese Corn 

and 

Norma Lee Candies 

Manhan Potato Chip Co., Inc. 


HATFIELD MARKET 

MEAT — PROVISIONS 
Tel. 3911 M. Klocko, Prop. 


DRESS WELL AND SUCCEED 

Stylish Wearin»- Apparel for the 

Man or Young- Man from 

Head to Foot 

THRIFTLY PRICED 

HARRY DANIEL ASSOCIATES 

Northampton 







E. J. GARE & SON 




Compliments of 


Hamilton, Elgin and 




SHEA & FORTSCH 


Girard Watches 
Main St. Northampton 




E. & J. CIGAR CO., INC. 






WHOLESALE 


Compliments of 
FRANK'S BARBER SHOP 




TOBACCONISTS 


Prospect St. Hatfield 




15 Maple St. Northampton 








Compliments of 




WEBSTER BOX 


TOCZKO PACKAGE STORE 

Telephone 2031 




COMPANY 


WE DELIVER 
Hatfield 




IMPERIAL BAKERY 


Compliments of 




SZYOSEK BROS. 


THE CALVIN FRUIT STORE 

Next to Calvin Theatre 




BREAD and PASTRY 


MIKE KARKUT, Prop. 




Pleasant St. Northampton 


23 King St. Northampton 



Compliments of 




GEORGE H. HOWARD 


Compliments of 


Insurance 


SQUARE DEAL 


66 Main St. Tel. 4462 


MOTORS SALES 


HATFIELD 




HARLOW & FENNESSEY 


PIERCE'S PAINT STORE 




196 Main St. Northampton 


SCHOOL SUPPLIES 


PAINT — WALLPAPER 


OFFICE SUPPLIES 


AND GLASS 


STATIONERY 


ARTISTS' MATERIALS 



CONN. RIVER STOCK FARM 



Birth Place of EVEN SONG, 2 yr. 2:08«,. 



Greatest Mother of Trotters 



Living or Dead 



THE WARREN KAY VALENTINE STUDIO, INC. 

SCHOOL AND COLLEGE 
PHOTOGRAPHERS 

132 Boylston St. Boston, Mass. 



Compliments of 



A FRIEND 



Compliments of Compliments of 




DEARING'S JEWELERS < V > SH0P 




Northampton and Easthampton 249 Mam Street 




TIMEPIECE SPECIALISTS Northampton 




For Correct Time Call BOOKS, STATIONERY 




Northampton 3511 


GREETING CARDS 




LA FLEUR BROS. 


Compliments of 

LABBEE'S 




The Paint People SERVICE STATION 




45 King- Street Northampton 


John Labbee, Prop. 




Tel. 374-M 


State Road 
West "Hatfield 




Compliments of 




PORTER-McLEOD MACHINE TOOL CO., INC. 




HATFIELD, MASS. 




McCALLUMS 




Northampton's Largest 




Department Store 




150-154 MAIN ST. PHONE 1310 





an 

SHI 






. ■::? S:\f-'. « g§ 



RHUS 




HisH Hi 

Hi Hi 



BHh